Daily Topics - Friday July 8th, 2011

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Watch! Thom Hartmann on the News...

Hour One: "Brunch With Bernie" - Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) takes your calls

Hour Two: Geeky Science Rocks - Ireland...Guiness beer, the blarney stone and...polar bears?!

Hour Three: Latest on the ExxonMobil Yellowstone River oil spill - Governor Brian Schweitzer (D-MT) / Plus, new poll shows Americans don't want cuts to Medicare - Former Congressman Billy Tauzin

Comments

Maxrot's picture
Maxrot 9 years 2 days ago
#1

Well Thom, in regards to your question about why won't any democrats speak up about how the Republicans ran up the debt that they're currently sqwaking about; I can only hope that we're closing in on the moment in which a single voice states that the emperor has no clothes, and that the surrounding crowd of citizens are not deaf. I think we are nearing the time where the citizens can no longer put up with their willing blindness to the situation they're in, but who knows.

N

mathboy's picture
mathboy 9 years 2 days ago
#2

Name one law that could have been overturned faster judicially than legislatively? All of them. When has the legislature ever repealed an Unconstitutional law before the judiciary got to it?

If reversing unconstitutional laws through the legislature were faster, you'd be able to give us examples, Thom.

Maxrot's picture
Maxrot 9 years 2 days ago
#3

It seems to me that if the Supreme Court is deciding what is and isn't constitutional, then ultimately government is in their hands. If the people are deciding what is and isn't constitutional, then ultimately government is in their hands (especially if we eliminated the Senate). So I guess we should take a look at the Constitution to see what we should do.

I forget, does the US Constitution start with The Supreme Court of The United States of America in order to form a more perfect union.... or does it begin with We The People....?

I always thought it was the duty of the courts to interpet the meaning of a law and apply it appropriately, not decide if a law is or is not appropriate. Perhaps that is why the founding fathers gave the court judges lifetime seats, because they assumed that they would have the most limited power, but would be made up of people with ever increasing experience with interpeting laws.

I also still wonder why we need the executive branch of Government. I'd be happy with the dismantling of the Senate, limiting of the Supreme Court power, and just letting the Speaker of the House be the one who assumes the duties and powers of the current Executive branch. I think that our founding fathers were too used to having a titular head when they created the Executive branch.

N

tim-mccoy's picture
tim-mccoy 9 years 2 days ago
#4

TOM!

They negotiate better drug prices ....get a great deal....and stick it in their own pockets. Because there is no competition among these health care providers.

Maxrot's picture
Maxrot 9 years 2 days ago
#5

Well a good example of an admendment that congress passed then repealed would have been the 18th. It was put into effect because of popular demand, and removed because of popular demand. The constitutionality of it though I doubt was ever in serious question. But that happened pretty fast, less than 20 years.

N

mathboy's picture
mathboy 9 years 2 days ago
#6

That's an amendment, not a law, Maxrot. The Supreme Court couldn't have repealed that.

Maxrot's picture
Maxrot 9 years 2 days ago
#7

The point of my statement was about how the people could vote in and then vote out something. I'm quite certain, that that could and would be done with any other legislation deemed undesirable by the people, and the case of the 18th admendment was my example of it.

It's Time To Tax Money Bins!

Thom plus logo England is debating a wealth tax. America, as tax revenues crash and the need for government services explodes, needs to consider one, too.

If you own a home, every year you must pay a wealth tax.

The majority of the wealth held by middle and working class Americans is in their homes. And every year, every homeowner must pay a tax on their wealth in the form of a state and local property tax.
From The Thom Hartmann Reader:
"With the ever-growing influence of corporate CEOs and their right-wing allies in all aspects of American life, Hartmann’s work is more relevant than ever. Throughout his career, Hartmann has spoken compellingly about the value of people-centered democracy and the challenges that millions of ordinary Americans face today as a result of a dogma dedicated to putting profit above all else. This collection is a rousing call for Americans to work together and put people first again."
Richard Trumka, President, AFL-CIO
From Unequal Protection, 2nd Edition:
"If you wonder why and when giant corporations got the power to reign supreme over us, here’s the story."
Jim Hightower, national radio commentator and author of Swim Against the Current
From The Thom Hartmann Reader:
"Right through the worst of the Bush years and into the present, Thom Hartmann has been one of the very few voices constantly willing to tell the truth. Rank him up there with Jon Stewart, Bill Moyers, and Paul Krugman for having the sheer persistent courage of his convictions."
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