Will Egyptians be swayed by international pressure?

In the days since the Egyptian military removed Mohamed Morsi from his presidency, violent protests have erupted in that nation. Dozens have been killed and more than one thousand people have been injured as pro-Morsi protesters clashed with those cheering the military's actions. Last week, the head of Egypt's constitutional court, Adly Mahmud Mansour, was sworn in as that nation's interim leader. Mansour has promised to hold elections soon, but it has done little to calm the massive protests in Cairo and other cities. And his first attempt at appointing an interim prime minister – Mohamed Elbaradei – was unsuccessful, as ultraconservative groups objected to the pro-reform leader.

The intense, ongoing fighting paints a clear picture of the need for a political solution, and it has leaders in the U.S. and the E.U. looking on with increasing alarm. Here at home, lawmakers disagree on whether or not the Egyptian military staged a coup in ousting President Morsi, and whether financial aid should be suspended to that nation. In an interview on CBS's “Face The Nation,” Senator John McCain declared that the Egyptian military had, in fact, staged a coup, and said, “Reluctantly, I believe that we have to suspend aid, until such time as there is a new constitution and a free and fair election.” However, on NBC's “Meet The Press”, Senate Foreign Relations Chair Robert Menendez said that aid should be used as leverage to push for a swift transition to civilian government. He said, “This is an opportunity to have a pause, and say to the Egyptians, you have an opportunity to come together.”

The road ahead for Egypt is far from certain, and there is intense pressure on interim leaders to reign in the violent protests, which appear to be intensifying. Regardless of international pressure, it appears that Egyptians are not ready to end this fight yet. Stay tuned.

Comments

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 9 years 21 weeks ago
#1

Is it a question of Egypt being swayed by international pressure or more so from pressure within. Violent protest only happen when governments don't listen to their own people. People know what they want and are happy to tell you. Violent protests only occur when government doesn't listen. It is time for Egyptian leaders to listen to their people. Serving the needs of its people is the only legitimate reason for the existence of government. Any government that fails to do so doesn't deserve to exist.

edayres's picture
edayres 9 years 21 weeks ago
#2

The Egyptians just received their 1.3 billion aid package from us. The politicians know this so it's all posturing. One moment Washington is complaining about Morsi's increasing authoritarianism, the next, making him an icon for democracy.

Loren Bliss's picture
Loren Bliss 9 years 21 weeks ago
#3

Egypt's paralysis is, perhaps ironically, a localized manifestation of the same sickness that has befallen the United States: a hard-core cult of religious fanatics who want zero-tolerance theocracy versus the vast majority that favors modern secularism.

In the U.S., the issue has already been decided. Supported by the One Percent with all its wealth, the fanatics not only control the government and the military, they have perfected a stealth approach to the imposition of theocracy that makes them virtually omnipotent. Note, for example, the methodical abolition of female reproductive rights that has now spread even to some of the allegedly "civilized" coastal states. (Those who doubt this should read Jeff Sharlet's The Family: The Secret Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power [HarperCollins: 2008], which documents not only the activities of the usual suspects but the dynamic role Hillary Clinton is playing in the advent of USian Christian theocracy.)

Meanwhile, in Egypt the situation remains in a state of flux, with the (nominally secular) military acting as not only political arbiter but protector of the secular and/or non-Islamic masses. Obviously the decisive factor will be which side the United States supports. Will it back the relatively libertarian forces symbolized by the military? Or will it back the forces of theocracy? Given the One Percent's preference for theocracy as the ultimate means of controlling the Working Class aka the 99 Percent, I'd anticipate the latter. Now though the USian Ruling Class is merely confused. The One Percenters cannot comfortably endorse the secularists, because at least some of the secularists -- perhaps many -- are socialists. Nor can the One Percenters easily get in bed with the Islamists, many of whom view the United States as "the Great Satan" and thus regard anything USian as "of the Devil." Ultimately of course whatever Washington decides to do will be determined by its judgment of which side offers the greater opportunity for profit.

stecoop01's picture
stecoop01 9 years 21 weeks ago
#4

The U.S. is a financial train wreck and we're still giving out American tax dollars to other countries?!?

Shoot me! Just shoot me!

N Z Sarah's picture
N Z Sarah 9 years 21 weeks ago
#5

The women were there and it was peaceful demonstrations. Where are they now it is not safe. Men behave better in the presence of women. EQUAL GENDER GOVERNMENTS will bring about a more balanced world.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 9 years 21 weeks ago
#6
Quote Loren Bliss:Will it back the relatively libertarian forces symbolized by the military? Or will it back the forces of theocracy? Given the One Percent's preference for theocracy as the ultimate means of controlling the Working Class aka the 99 Percent, I'd anticipate the latter. Now though the USian Ruling Class is merely confused. The One Percenters cannot comfortably endorse the secularists, because at least some of the secularists -- perhaps many -- are socialists. Nor can the One Percenters easily get in bed with the Islamists, many of whom view the United States as "the Great Satan" and thus regard anything USian as "of the Devil." Ultimately of course whatever Washington decides to do will be determined by its judgment of which side offers the greater opportunity for profit.

Loren Bliss ~ That is a brilliant and accurate analysis. Unfortunately, though I side with the secularists, and to some degree the libertarian forces, my heart goes out to the Islamists. Their contention that the US is "the Great Satan" can be supported so easily with our own Judeo Christian prophecies that I cannot help but respect their perspective. I must assume you are predicting that Washington will ultimately pick the side of the theocracy--however you want to define the term. Of course we both know that the traditional Webster dictionary definition of "theocracy" does not properly apply in this case. Perhaps "Synagogue of Satan" would be more appropriate. That would fit perfectly with the Islamist contention as well as the US agenda.

2950-10K's picture
2950-10K 9 years 21 weeks ago
#7

The Egyptians need not look far back in world history to realize religious fundamentalism and good government do not mix. Obviously they understand the proverbial wall of separation is an absolute here. In my opinion the Morsi situation would be analogous to red states putting Pat Robertson in the White House. I'd expect our military to do the right thing and liberate us from his religious tyranny as well.

Many Eqyptians due in part to social media are aware of the wonderful lifestyles afforded citizens of European countries practicing aspects of Democratic Socialism. They see it, they want it, and by god I hope they get it. The question is, how do we motivate our red state citizens to pull their heads out of their asses and do the same thing right here?

Kend's picture
Kend 9 years 21 weeks ago
#8

Just wondering edayres how much of that 1.3 billion is in Morsi's Caymen bank account. Say it isn't so, Obama's adminasrtration waffling on something.

Do you think Canada could get a aid package because we have no pipelines to sell our oil.

Rev.Judy's picture
Rev.Judy 9 years 21 weeks ago
#9

Watch Turkey. The people are holding forums in parks around the country where people speak their minds peacefully and refuse to take political sides. They don't yell or protest. They use ha d jestures to I dictate agreement or dissent about what is being saidaa so police don't have an excuse to attack Addax may the rest of the world follow their example!

David J. Cyr's picture
David J. Cyr 9 years 21 weeks ago
#10

tanks in the streets:

what every major city in the U.S. would have, on the day after the American people disobediently provided a popular vote mandate for a POTUS candidate who wasn't a money manufactured corporate (R) & D) party sociopath

military coup:

a means by which America's Nobel Peace Prize winners (Kissinger and Obama) both removed democratically elected governments that had replaced fascist regimes America, Inc. prefers to do business with

a U.S. backed military takeover that isn't officially referred to as a "coup" if correctly using that word would legally require an end to U.S. military aid for the fascist government U.S. aid has installed

how Obama brought "democracy" to Honduras in 2009, and to Egypt in 2013

something that isn't necessary, if Democrats are elected

______________________________

The APT: American Political Terms:

www.chenangogreens.org

bobcox's picture
bobcox 9 years 21 weeks ago
#11

The US has a reputation of messing in other people's business if it will help the commercial interests to get more from the interference. The fruit business in Nicaragua and Honduras is an example but don't forget the pressure on the Cuban revolution leading up to the US involvement in the ?Spanish-American War.
This is the basis of the Al Qaeda hatred of US policies.
the support of the conservative Islamic leaders in the remote areas of Egypt probably voted per the Imams preaching, i.e., government ruled by the Qumran as interpreted by the conservative political belief that government and religion are the same. The more secular areas of Egypt probably did not vote as a unit and split voting, though better from a Democracy point of view is poor from an election procedure. As long as the conservatives vote as a block and the secularists vote for various independents, they conservatives will win.

This is similar to the practice in the US where the top 10% vote as a block and the 90% vote sparingily and often according to TV commercials rather than tthere own interests.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 9 years 21 weeks ago
#12

Morsi and The Muslim Brotherhood must be removed immediately. They do not represent Islam. They represent the Synagogue of Satan. To those who know Satan there is no explanation necessary. To those who don't, Satan is an entity that is much more than just evil or self centered. Satan is criminally insane. So are they who follow. Morsi will do anything to stay in power. He would sacrifice the law, the people, even his own children. This is the example set by Satan. There is no reasoning with this creature. There is no reprieve. It will take and take for the sake of taking until there is no more to take. The fact that Washington sides with the Morsi regime says a lot about Washington and our poor nation.

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