Regulation and Enforcement Protect Consumers.

Despite billions of dollars in fines and numerous new regulations, the mortgage industry has still been breaking the law. A new report by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau details how the industry has continued abusing consumers, and why we need an agency tasked with protecting our rights. According to this report, mortgage servicing companies have been forging paperwork, illegally foreclosing on homes, and even forcing borrowers to sign away their legal rights just to get a loan modification.

These companies are essentially the middle men between banks and borrowers, handling everything from mortgage payments to the foreclosure process, but they haven't been doing their jobs. The CFPB report found that several servicing companies were flat-out incompetent, and others were just ignoring the law. Because of these findings, the CFPB banned these companies from participating in federal mortgage modification programs, and collected millions of dollars for wronged consumers in the second half of last year.

The CFPB's report shows that companies like this cannot be trusted, and that government regulation and enforcement are necessary to protect consumers. Billions in fines, bad press, and even an economic collapse were not enough to stop these companies from preying on Americans, but thankfully the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is sticking up for us.

Comments

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 26 weeks ago
#1

Hip-Hip-Hooray for the CFPB!! Those mortgage companies should be subject to the corporate death penalty. I wonder how many people are left homeless and on the streets as a result of their abusive, illegal business practices.

When my husband & I moved to Oregon and bought our first home over twenty years ago, we picked a piece of property cheap enough that we could own it outright from the start, thus avoiding a mortgage. In light of all the mortgage abuses and foreclosures to have surfaced since then, I now realize that it was one of the smartest decisions we ever made. It was a modest place; a mobile home, just a little over a thousand square feet, but in good condition; a palace compared to any of those dilapidated dumps we'd rented back in California. It served us well for the next seventeen years, before we eventually replaced it with this manufactured home.

Before we got this property, landlords had turned our lives inside out, forcing us to move every few years. It had taken quite a toll on us. Even before all that mortgage crap was exposed to the light, it seemed to me that dealing with a mortgage company might be no better than dealing with a landlord. How right I was. - Aliceinwonderland

ckrob's picture
ckrob 8 years 26 weeks ago
#2

We have one persistent woman to thank for the CFPB, Elizabeth Warren! You can send her money for her good deeds. Other polititians will notice if we non-corporate persons reward good work. Off topic - People leaving a job because of Obamacare is not the same as a disappearing job. The position simply opens to someone else looking for work. Sounds like a good thing. Additionally, businesses will soon see it will benefit them and their employees if they move to the larger risk pools afforded by Obamacare. Everyone benefits except the insurance companies.

sandlewould's picture
sandlewould 8 years 26 weeks ago
#3

In the words of Chuck Schumer; "...Frankly, they own the place." ..and I don't think he just meant 'own' in the sense of simply buying politicians, but in cooperation with companies like Stratfor and Booz Allen Hamilton, the financial industry can hold whatever they want over law makers' heads. The economic hit men have come to America. The crash in '08 was engineered. They knew exactly what they were doing. What better way to raid the US treasury than to engineer a crash and then cry 'too big to fail'? Of course the crash did not stop them, it only wet their appetites for the next one. If an American turns on it's Government, it's called treason. What is it called when America's legislators and leaders turn on Americans knowing that if they don't, these mega-corporations will ruin them, or worse? They will not stop until they've sucked every last dime out of our pockets and raided our commons, then they will cannibalize each other. As I write, waiting for Thom to come on, I am listening to the woes of National Parks. These rangers and biologists, thrown out of jobs because of 30 years of cuts, think it was because governments wanted to save money. No, the 2-fold mission of the mega-corporations who 'own' the politicians is this; to syphon $$$ out of the commons and into the troughs of the rich first, then weaken the commons to such an extent they can the swoop down and log, drill, frack and mine the parks into oblivion for more profit. God-dess save our parks!

ken ware's picture
ken ware 8 years 26 weeks ago
#4

Could you explain to me how the crash of 2008 was engineered? It is my understanding that mortgage based securities or derivatives sold to investors was the lynch pin of the crash. In simple terms the sub-prime mortgage crisis began to affect the investment banks that backed these mortgages coupled with the derivatives that were also backed by these bogus mortgages began to fail. Faith in the Stock Market and the banks caused the Market to begin its nose dive over the next several months. Unemployment began to soar upward and the demand for houses and goods dropped drastically in the coming months, causing more failures. The mortgage backed derivatives also affected Europe, which had a great effect on the multi-national Investment Banks running out of money to cover their losses. And, there are several more factors that caused the investment banks to fail, the greatest being they could not absorb the losses from the debt swap derivatives and the failing mortgages that affected the mortgage backed derivatives. The government felt it was necessary to bail these banks out, starting with Bear Sterns, and the bailouts ended up costing $700,000,000,000. The whole mess is more complicated than what I have noted, and it would take a couple of pages to explain the technical realities that caused the Stock Market, Investment Banks and jobs to crash. After reading several articles I found on the internet by using Google, it appears the main ingredient in this whole mess that almost brought the U.S. and Europe into a complete financial melt-down was GREED on the part of the INVESTMENT BANKERS. The greed allowed the banks and third party loan evaluators to grant mortgages to people who simply could not afford to buy homes. The scheme that was put together by the Investment Banks to sell as many mortgages and mortgage backed derivatives as possible and lie about the risk involved in these complicated derivatives was a matter of simple greed and the ideology that making a quick profit was more important than maintaining a secure banking system. Greed is the culprit that almost brought us all down and may still do so in the future, since the same upper management of these failed banks remains basically the same! http://useconomy.about.com/od/Financial-Crisis/a/Stock-Market-Crash-2008.htm has an interesting article about how this crisis began. K.W. (I cannot get the link to copy correctly so you could just click on the website and be there. It must be Hartmann’s website that will not allow this procedure.)

ckrob's picture
ckrob 8 years 26 weeks ago
#5

Should any reader think sandlewould exaggerates, read Naomi Klein's "The Shock Doctrine." Big money has been practicing the cannibalization of other countries for years and now they turn what they learned to the biggest prize of all, us! Klein provides chapter and verse about how they are doing it.

sandlewould's picture
sandlewould 8 years 26 weeks ago
#6

ckrob,

Reading Naomi's book was satisfying, because for 20 years people had been telling me I was crazy, but also horribly sad because I so desperately wanted to be wrong. GREAT book...and great accompanying lecture:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWI4p8KuJfs

Kend's picture
Kend 8 years 26 weeks ago
#7

Well said Ken W. I have never seen it described better.

With all due respect your banking system is horrible. I am blessed to be in a country that has probaly the best system in the world. On my last trip down to AZ I was shocked to see they are offering mortages with almost nothing down again. Are you kidding me that is what got you in so much trouble in the first place. I just don't understand why Americans get so far in debt. If you can't afford it don't buy it. Maybe SAVE the money first. I think you can right off the interest but doesn't it just offset the interest you are paying?

Alice, for every bad thing that happened to you as a renter I can tell at least ten that happened to me as a landlord. I would tell you a few now but I don't want to spoil your dinner.

sandlewould's picture
sandlewould 8 years 26 weeks ago
#8

Ken

Me thinks you take me too literally. By 'engineered' I meant: Step 1. Deregulate (repeal of glass steagal) Step 2. Create "exotic" financial "instruments" Step 3. utilize algorithms and computers to generate massive quantities of trades per second. Step 3. When the system crashes (and we know it will) Make sure you have the right legislators and fed chairs in place to do our bidding; i.e. buy our toxic debt and steal from the average tax payor to bail us out, threatening global financial catastrophe if you don't. I'm sure there are steps 4- at least 10, but that is the limit of my understanding... Those in positions of most power took advantage of the bankers' greed. Maybe the money managers just thought the feeding frenzy would go on forever, but those at the helm knew exactly what would happen.

sandlewould's picture
sandlewould 8 years 26 weeks ago
#9

Kend

We go into debt because, we don't get paid enough to save for anything and because the banks make it cheaper to buy than to rent. We have to own cars ‘cause our public transit sucks, and THEY are expensive. The banks LOVE our debt. Ever hear economist Richard Wolff on the subject? He discusses how corporations realized they could lend us our wages, instead of paying them to us... it started with the advent of the credit card. Many manufacturers literally invested the wages they held back from workers in banks that then those banks issued credit to the very workers who were denied adequate pay. I worked three jobs(one was my own business, but couldn’t afford health insurance so had to work) and still only had about $5,000 in an IRA when I lost my job. I was a landlord and if it wasn’t for the equity in my home when I sold it would have nothing now. Our entire economy is based on debt, it’s all we have available to us. The other BIG reason we’re in so much debt is our F’D up health care system...that’s THE biggy.

SHFabian's picture
SHFabian 8 years 26 weeks ago
#10

These issues primarily effect the middle class, which spent so many years demanding deregulation. It would be an insult to restore the regulations that they so strongly opposed.

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 26 weeks ago
#11

SHFabian -- You call it an insult, I would call it democracy; that is, we tried it and didn't like it. (reply to #10 by c8)

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 26 weeks ago
#12

that was #11 not #10 -- c8

leighmf's picture
leighmf 8 years 26 weeks ago
#13

KW- If you are interested, I posted a diagram of the mortgage crisis pyramid which was begun in 1868 by The Corporation of Foreign Bondholders in London.The Corporation formed to protect patent relationships and advance the interest of preferred stockholders through two centuries of railroad bankruptcies and war betweenpatent and interest holders. The modus operandi was casting bonded debt into the future with time devices such as 99-yr leases, against which money was borrowed, and 100-yr- gold mortgage bonds which are held between banks but not necessarily satisfied. In 1904 railroad mortgage bonds were allowed to be counted as "deposits" in banks.

The Corporation Directors included Fried.Krupp, Robert Fleming, Samuel Hanna (Union Pacific RR grantee, Hugh McCulloch, both President of Fort Wayne (National City Bank) and Lincoln's Secretary of the Treasury, E.R. Harriman, and later C.E. Barnett, of the Barnett Bankers which funneled many goodies to Bank of America following the Florida Land Crash and other of our forerunner robber barons.

It is important to know that when Johnson "sold" our federal national mortgage securities in 1968, the empire of Alfried Krupp defaulted on its numerous loans from German Banks with the abolishment of Lex Krupp, a law which had exempted the sole proprietorship of the weapons manufacturer from taxation. Krupp incorporated, to gain tax advantages, and Republic Film Corp. in the U.S. was bought by the entity, later becoming Republic Steel. It was within the next few years that the northern steel towns became waste areas as our former steel industry was systematically shut down.

ckrob's picture
ckrob 8 years 26 weeks ago
#14

Let me echo the Richard Wolff plug. He has, among other things, a monthly series on YouTube that makes economics very understandable AND entertaining. BTW, if you got the usual economic stuff taught in most colleges for the last thirty years prepare to be jarred. He also notes what is working economically outside the U.S. Which, of course, the corp-media won't cover.

Kend's picture
Kend 8 years 26 weeks ago
#15

I don't know saddle you get paid pretty good there. Just ask some one in India or China. Yes banks do like debt that's how they make there money. . Americans have more TVs , cars, and RVs etc. than any one else in the world. Just maybe you live beyond your means.

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 26 weeks ago
#16

Kend, kend, kend.... you think we're paid well here, eh? Like people LOVE working three jobs just to be barely making ends meet, and going to food banks... And wasn't it generous of Walmart to ask for donations from customers, just so their employees could afford a turkey for Thanksgiving! It really warms my heart to know our taxes are covering the benefits Walmart refuses to pay their employees (and that's just one example).

What planet are you from, anyway? It seems not a word of Sandlewould's post even got through to you. - AIW

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 26 weeks ago
#17

[Reply to post #8; not #9]

Kend, I'm not going to argue with your closing statement, addressed to me. I happen to think the whole system of rental housing stinks. Having also been in the cleaning business for years, I've seen it from both sides. As a tenant I had to deal with a procession of negligent, greedy, deadbeat landlords who never took care of their responsibilities as landlords or fulfilled their end of the bargain. As professional cleaners, my husband & I saw the messes left by tenants who live like pigs, leaving a trail of filth and ruin behind for others to clean up. The system brings out the worst in people whether they are landlords or renters. I'm tremendously relieved to have found us an escape hatch from the whole disgusting racket.

I really wish more people could own their homes. Housing is such a basic need we all have, for sanity as well as survival. My sympathies lean towards tenants for one simple reason: 99.999% of those who rent their homes do it because they have no better options and are forced by necessity. However landlords become landlords by choice, not by necessity. Of all the landlords I've had in my life, I can't recall a single one I left on good terms. They all sucked; every goddam one of them. - Aliceinwonderland

ken ware's picture
ken ware 8 years 26 weeks ago
#18

Kend - There you go again, rattling off some nonsense about comparing China's slave labor force and the hard working Americans who have seen their jobs shipped off to the land of dictatorship and enslavement. Just to open your eyes a little about owning a home here in Southern California, oops did I give away my location, yes. In the area where I reside the average small three bedroom home that is on average about 25 years old, sells for around $575,000, if you can find one that cheap. New homes average around $750,000 for about the same sq. footage, maybe a little larger. Which interprets into a monthly mortgage payment of approximately $6,000 for a new home, after a large down payment. And, believe me, as far as getting into a home for zero down, it must be a really shit of a house or it is a scam. I grant you that prices are a little higher here, but so are wages for professional white collar workers. You really think the average guy that works for a living with a two income family of four (wife working also) can afford a monthly payment like that? The same houses that are selling for $575,000, sold for $39,000 when they were new, I know I was there! Unless you are living in the past, today's prices have jumped out of the range of the average family here. Wages for the average worker have not kept pace with the increase of housing costs for the last 25 years. (Wages have stagnated for the last 25 years; employers can hire cheap labor with our borders wide open for everyone to enter, like the people you hire) You really have a way of getting under my skin with your non-thinking statements. You might have a great banking system, but who the hell wants to live in a frozen waste land, where you have to go to a desert community in a backwards thinking state like Arizona to relax!( Homes in Az. are half what they are here, and there is good reason for that) .Not this guy! So if you want to make idiotic statements about wages and buying a home, check the facts first. I really am trying not to be the heavy when rebutting someone's statements, but you make it really difficult. Have a good evening, I know under all that snow lays a good guy at heart. K.W.

sandlewould's picture
sandlewould 8 years 26 weeks ago
#19

Kend,

Not a day goes by when I don’t pause, with gratitude that we make many times what workers in India, China, etc. make. Yes we get paid very well in the US...but not compared to the cost of what is available to us. Not that I advocate for this, but in India, if you don’t have indoor plumbing, you just wander into the Ganges and...well...you know. That’s not exactly socially acceptable where I live. No indoor plumbing in the US means you are a loser who deserves to starve or freeze. No indoor plumbing in India means your one of “us”. What frustrates me is the effort by those who have rigged the game to take our wages down instead of pull the wages of Indians and Chinese up...and...again, not that this is the ideal, but when is the last time you could legally rent a lean-to in the main-land US? I have a child-hood friend (her father had a seat on the NYSE in the 70s...not a poor family) who says her quality of life was highest when she lived in a lean-to in Jamaica (they had community composting toilets and access to clean water). She sold her art in the morning, using the $$ to by produce, meeting her husband in the afternoon who had fished for the remainder of their dinner as she painted and drew the art she would sell the next day, etc. As Jesus said..”consider the birds of the air, they worry not nor toil not for their food...” THAT...is how we all should be living, but until we can stop begrudging one another each others’ poverty and learn to share our fortunes...well here we are. BTW, I'm not in debt now, and do not live beyond my means, but I know many who are in debt and the "means" they live beyond, and without, is housing, food, and healthcare.

ken ware's picture
ken ware 8 years 26 weeks ago
#20

eighmf - Thanks for the info, I will look at it. One little disagreement about the Steel Industry evaporating in the 70's. We did not invest in new technology in the field of steel production and the Unions (whom I really like in general, for what they do for their members) did not believe the people in charge when they said they would shut the furnaces off and get rid of the workers, but they did. We lost the industry to the Japanese, where they simply undercut the costs it took to make steel here. We had several plants here in California, who were shut down for the reasons I have mentioned above. And, from what I have read, China is now doing the same to Japan as they did to us. I think we were better off when Red China was seen as the enemy of democracy and not the purchaser of democracies like ours! K.W.

sandlewould's picture
sandlewould 8 years 26 weeks ago
#21

Leigh...

Brilliant, and thoughtful. TY

Kend's picture
Kend 8 years 26 weeks ago
#22

Alice you are one of the few who seen both sides. Thanks for being honest.

ken ware's picture
ken ware 8 years 26 weeks ago
#23

sandlewould - I do take people too literally! But, I think those who were in power were also filled with GREED and did not think the system would implode as fast as it did. With that exception, I concur with everything you wrote. K.W.

sandlewould's picture
sandlewould 8 years 26 weeks ago
#24

;) ...Greed Greed ...I wonder if the writer of the screenplay...was it 'Wall Street' ... Gordon Gecco "greed is good" ...knew the Pandora's box they were unleashing...

ken ware's picture
ken ware 8 years 26 weeks ago
#25

Kend - I am beginning to believe you make controversial comments to see how many people you can piss off! Well, it does keep this blog page jumping with some interesting responses from different people with different points of view in general. Keep it up!

Kend's picture
Kend 8 years 26 weeks ago
#26

ken w yes I live in the frozen north but I choose to. Here I can and did provide for my family very well. Because only the people willing to put up with the extreme weather conditions can live here we have a very high standard of living. Most can afford the best education for their children. there is no earthquakes, hurricanes We don't have any sliders or snakes that can kill you. We have very low unemployment. our air quality is excellent and smells like pine trees not smog. It's not so bad here. You should come up some day. you might really like it.

To be fair you live in one of the most expensive areas in N. American. You can buy that same home in Phoenix for $75,000 and the wages are the same there. Taxes are lower and the air quality is better.

Kend's picture
Kend 8 years 26 weeks ago
#27

Saddle. You have to admit dont you that Americans live just a little above there means. That's all I am saying. Maybe a little less spending. I am amazed when I go down there that there isn't a price on anything. It is x amount a month or something99 biweekly. Doesn't anyone there pay cash. I am not talking about food. I am talking about hot tubs, RVs, boats etc. those things in my mind shouldn't be financed they are luxuries. Leave the boat on the lot and save for your child's education.

sandlewould's picture
sandlewould 8 years 26 weeks ago
#28

Yea, I suppose...if our financial regs make "luxuries" more accessible than staples like food and shelter then that's what a hopeless, depressed population will go for.

ken ware's picture
ken ware 8 years 26 weeks ago
#29

sandlewould - I doubt they thought that far down the line! Their motives were how much money can I (we) make now legally or illegally. It is too bad it affected so many innocent people around the globe. I read articles where small townships in Europe invested in the mortgage derivatives scam and lost all they invested and had to shut down senior centers and schools, in order to pay their debts! And, towns all over America got caught up in the bogus debt swap derivatives and had to cancel many necessary projects due to the losses they sustained in these scams. If there is a Hell, I hope these guys get a front row seat for their crimes against humanity.

sandlewould's picture
sandlewould 8 years 26 weeks ago
#30

Ken,

I think whoever promoted Reagan to run and get elected was thinking in terms of starve the commons to privatize...but not necessarily in line with premeditated financial crisis, but who knows? There are some that say that, since the privatization of the Fed, every crash has been more or less allowed, if not intended though not precisely timed, in order for the private financial industry to loot public coffers... ? Someone mentioned earlier...and her research and intellect far exceed mine ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWI4p8KuJfs#sthash.YG9m6qNT.dpuf

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 26 weeks ago
#31

Ken Ware ~ Again I must concur with you. I remember back then I was approached by one of these mortgage negotiators. He was a customer of mine at the time. He asked what I paid in rent and I told him $525/mo. He insisted he could put me in a house for that price. The going home mortgage payments at the time were $2500/mo. I knew he was BSing me and I wanted to close his mouth... and I wanted to keep my job. What are you going to do? I was infuriated; yet, I was also quite fortunate. We need to keep these kinds of predatory loaners away from our children and our people. Thanks for pointing that out.

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 26 weeks ago
#32

Kend... JEEZ! Didn't any of Sandlewould's last response get through to you? Like she stated so succinctly: "...the 'means' they live beyond, and without, is housing, food and healthcare". You are so out of touch with the reality here in America, pal, it's not even funny. I can scarcely believe you spend so much time here, the way you have us all stereotyped as financially irresponsible oafs. For your information, over half the bankruptcies in the U.S. are over medical bills; NOT boats, RVs or hot tubs. Excuse me... but when working people live beyond their means just having the barest of necessities, ya gotta ask yourself: What's wrong with this picture? - AIW

ken ware's picture
ken ware 8 years 26 weeks ago
#33

I have to agree we do live in one of the best environments in the World. But, really now, would you actually live in Phoenix? And, I have to disagree that you can buy the same houses in Az. for $75,000 and the wages my friend are not the same. My brother lives in a town outside of Phoenix and he regrets ever leaving this part of California. And, just for your info, we have very little smog in this part of the L.A. area, (beach winds blow every afternoon like clockwork) the worst smog rolls in from China on the Jet Stream. You can check that out on Google. As far as earthquakes go, they have them in almost every state here and I am sure if you have mountain ranges in Canada, you too can have the Earth shake around you due to faults in the land, when the mountains were forming. Even N. Dakota has had minor earthquakes due to fracking! And, I do believe you use fracking in Canada. And, by the way, I put my daughter through a major university here and she went on to earn her Master’s in Education. So, not everyone has to live in a deep freeze to be able to send their children to a school of higher learning. I will keep S. Cal. and you stay in that frozen waste land, I think we are both too old to change now! K.W.

Kend's picture
Kend 8 years 26 weeks ago
#34

Very interesting. hard to believe it all started in a Canada university. I Find it hard to believe that any government could organize anything that big. Look how they are screwing up the ACA.

Kend's picture
Kend 8 years 26 weeks ago
#35

Yes ken w and how could we leave where our grandchildren live.

leighmf's picture
leighmf 8 years 26 weeks ago
#36

So, ask yourself, why didn't we invest in new technology? Because Krupp was superior at refining steel. And don't forget Hoffa and the thugs who infiltrated the autowerks and transportation in general. Seems like Toyotas were the next big thing in cars...

Don't think the Japanese weren't in bed with Germany and the U.S. during the Wars. U.S. Steel was accused by the government of importing steel to Germany in favor of meeting our needs for war time.

During War II the Japanese Royal family passed their time at Greenbrier Resort in South Carolina, now owned by CSX.

Originally Mitsui had copper but no way to get it out of the mountains. All U.S. Railroads used Krupp Steel tires, and in exchange for copper we gave the Mitsui family its first railroads.

Kend's picture
Kend 8 years 26 weeks ago
#37

Alice I knew there was a lot of bankruptcies over medical bills but I didn't know it was half. But I wasn't talking about the small percentage that went bankrupt I am talking about the tens of millions of Americans that live pay check to pay check by choice because they over spend. Just because I live in a country that has government health care does make our housing affordable. We are taxed way more than you. Americans still have more disposable income than Canadians.

ken ware's picture
ken ware 8 years 26 weeks ago
#38

sandlewould - I have to agree with you about Reagan (ray-gun) when it comes to privatizing the commons. When I was a young man, it was affordable to go to a Cal State University here, without going into debt with student loans. They even built apartment houses designed for students in the areas where students would be going to school. Sad to say those days are long gone for the Sunshine State, and probably so for the rest of the states. I have no idea how families send their children to universities today. My daughter is in her thirties with a new baby son. She and her husband have already started my grandson's college fund and add to it each month. Everyone realizes by the time Aiden is old enough to go to the university, it will take a great deal of money. I wish others had the means to do the same, when most are concerned with feeding, clothing and housing their kids today. Our government needs to invest in our children’s futures before it is too late. It seems like the government and the wealthy want to build a state of drones to keep their cheap labor profits coming in. In California today, most schools are investing in computers and tablets for the kids to use in class, so they will be ready for tomorrows demands for working and education. Now, it is time for the Federal Government to do the same. Instead of cuts to education, we need to prioritize our children’s education for a better America. K.W.

ken ware's picture
ken ware 8 years 26 weeks ago
#39

Kend - We could not leave, where our Grand Children live. You are so right on that one my friend. My grandson Aiden has given new meaning to my life, and I am thankful everyday for him. Have a good night my friend...K.W. P.S. For those of you who do not use the new technologies available, you should try face to face tecnology on a IPhone with you grandkids and you will know what I mean about it helping to make a better life and not to be afraid of it! But that is another story for another day.. I cannot believe it is almost 8:30 p.m., I forgot about dinner!

Kend's picture
Kend 8 years 26 weeks ago
#40

KenW My oldest Hailey turned eight today. I just bought my mom a ipad because she lives in a different city so she could face time her great grandchildren. You are so right about technology.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 26 weeks ago
#41

Ken ~ What a coincidence. My nephew Aiden begins preschool tomorrow. In the past we have disagreed about some minor issues. In whole we agree about 98% of the time on most issues. I believe if we were to meet in person we would really hit it off. I hope that you would put our past differences behind us. Congratulations on your grandson. I'm truly happy for you. Let us pick it up in the future where we left off in the past--with our agreements. I can truly say that in the past you have left a tear in my eye with your perspective. It might be a little lame to say at this time but truly I hope you find the time to stay with our little forum. I believe you enrich the discussion as much as anything else; and, I find that I miss your commentary. Sincerely, DAM

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 26 weeks ago
#42

Kend- Living paycheck-to-paycheck by choice?! I give up. You just don't get it, and you never will. I can only assume that is your choice. At any rate, I'm done wasting my time on this discussion. - AIW

Mark Saulys's picture
Mark Saulys 8 years 26 weeks ago
#43

I don't doubt, Kend, that bad things happened to you as a landlord and perhaps tenfold to the experiences of renters as a renter has only one landlord and a landlord has perhaps many multiplicities of renters but we in our legal system (which intentionally makes it difficult for you to evict) errs on the side of renters because we don't want a lot of homeless people in our society, which is a policy priority I support.

Our arguments illustrate why Karl Marx, in sociology, is considered a "conflict theorist", i.e., a sociological theorist who claims that people's purposes and vested interests in society are fundamentally in conflict with one another. In capitalism the renter and landlord; the buyer, the merchant; the employer and employee have vested interests fundamentally in conflict with one another and thus they invariably have a fair amount of emnity between them.

Each is trying to get the most in return for the least - which, of course, is the basic generalized business model. It may appear to one, and maybe only because it's just enticing to see it that way, that the other, opposing party is malicious in intent and that may or may not be the case, but really, even without any malice, they would be simply seeking the most cost effective way of doing things and of conducting their own affairs.

Mark Saulys's picture
Mark Saulys 8 years 26 weeks ago
#44

Kend, with our previous healthcare systems, a credit industry that encourages debt (to the point of pushing cards on college freshmen who lack the worldliness to manage their money wisely), a student loan system like we have, etc. there seems to be a willful try by the banks to put everybody into a debt bondage. Not that long ago (before 1980, of course, before Reagan) Americans had very little debt and much in personal savings. Now the opposite is true and I don't think it's because suddenly Americans lost any sense of self discipline, especially since it coincides with the most moralizing and self righteous period, emphasizing the absolute essentiality of "personal responsibility", in recent American history.

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 26 weeks ago
#45

Mark, your patience is WAY more enduring than mine. No matter what I try telling Kend, he just doesn't get it. Perhaps he doesn't want to get it, but only wants to blame us for everything. At any rate, I'm done. I resign. - AIW

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 26 weeks ago
#46

Lets not forget that people are the way they are largely because of the psychological manipulation through commercials. Our capitalist system is a system built on maximizing greed. And with all those commercial glamorizing greed and materialism what do you expect?

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 26 weeks ago
#47
Quote Aliceinwonderland:At any rate, I'm done. I resign.

Aliceinwonderland ~ I'm surprised and disappointed. I would have so expected you to say, "Beam me up!"

I'm sure that is what the away team would have said had they ever encountered a lifeform like Kend. I can just hear Mr. Spock, "Fascinating Captain! It appears to defy logic. Certainly we should stay and examine this most peculiar anomaly?"

"No, Mr. Spock," Kirk replies. "I've seen enough! Beam me up!"

As the Enterprise flies out of orbit at Warp 8 Kirk says, "Log this class M planet as hostile with non intelligent lifeforms. I recommend a permanent quarantine."

Thanks Kend!

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 26 weeks ago
#48

Richard Stallman, inventor of the original GNU project, was on Oksana Boyko in RT’s Worlds Apart show today, said that he never uses cell phones in large part because of the NSA spying program. He was also talking about the old UKUSA/Echelon program where each member country would skirt their internal laws against spying on their own citizens by spying on each others citizens then swapping the information. This was being done a long time ago. Now...they don't even have to do that...they spy on us directly. Exactly what they planned when they did the 9/11 false flag operation*. And as far back as 2005, businesses were able to spy on their own employees activities and whereabouts at any given time through the business cell phones they expected their employees to use.

When people give up their expectation of freedom and privacy... maybe they really do deserve what they end up with....fascist regimes like Nazi Germany...perhaps? You don't think it can happen again!? Maybe I'll ask you again one day when we are all sitting in gas chambers waiting for the Zyklon B to fall through the chutes. When rich and powerful controlling groups of people have all the technology to control what you think, say, or do we will all be brainless automaton slaves that will have no other recourse but to do exactly what they want us to think, say, or do. Hitler had the latest technology...provided by IBM in the US...and other businesses from ball bearings to bank loans.

You say you dislike this or that and think that all you have to do is go to the polls to vote in yet another obsequious toady President or Congress members. You really think you're going to change things? Yet, here you are falling prey to the tools that they manipulate to keep you from ever really ever changing anything.

Unless you get rid of those NSA spy devices or jail-break them and load them with non-proprietary (open source) software you, just like the pied piper of Hamlin's mice, will all be drowned in your own pool of stupidity.

As Richard Stallman said on the show...they are trying to say that it is all about governments spying on other governments..but, that's something governments have always done anyway...no big deal...what IS the big deal is that they are spying on the people...that's what they try to de-emphasize. That's what they don't want us to be constantly aware of.

So, these governments, who all spy on other governments are also now spying on all their own people. The rich and powerful of all nations have a vested interest in keeping the people from overthrowing them, internal dissent, and they work together to distract us from the truth. All these governments need the propaganda they generate to keep us fearful of the other countries but the real fear should be what our own ruling elite in each of our own countries are doing to us...no matter what country we live in. The real enemies are the ruling elites of each country.

So, just like all the other people who have been psychologized into sacrificing their future for convenience..whether it be that new car or house or big screen tv you really can't afford and put on credit...or that little device that causes brain cancer...that microwave transmitter you put up to one ear...you are all alike...you're all falling for the trickery of those who would imprison you one way or another. And there will always be wealthy people who will scorn you for not having will power or the sense to live within your means...or the sense to stop doing things that will do you in one way or the other.
*(note: some of the things I mention here was not talked about by Richard Stallman...I don't know what his thoughts are on 9/11).
http://rt.com/op-edge/stallman-surveillance-keep-democracy-894/

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 26 weeks ago
#49

And look out...I just heard that technology has provided a way to heal bullet wounds in 15 seconds..some kind of injection....expected to be very useful on the battle fields. I guess that means that we'll have a lot more wars! Of course, I doubt that the new invention will help grow new legs or arms...or heads. Maybe it's not "Beam me up, Scotty!" it's "Up your beam, Scotty!"

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 26 weeks ago
#50

PD, Marc- Thanks for cheering me up. I needed that...

Thom's Blog Is On the Move

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