Our economic system is broken.

Wall Street banksters raked in almost $27 billion dollars in bonuses last year, yet Congress can't even get it together to raise the minimum wage. According to the New York State Comptroller's office, the gamblers on Wall Street raked in $26.7 billion dollars in bonuses in 2013 – 15 percent more than they did the previous year. That's enough money to double the paycheck of every single minimum wage worker in our country.

Our economic system is so completely broken that banksters got another pile of cash after wrecking our economy while millions of real working people put in long, hard hours for paychecks that leave them in poverty. And, this keeps happening even though it does not make a lick of economic sense. Every extra dollar paid to a low-wage worker generates about $1.20 for our economy. When that dollar goes to line the pockets of the super-rich instead, it adds less than 40 cents to our GDP. The banksters and the corporate elite can afford to stash their money away in foreign countries and high-return risky investments, while real working Americans have to spend every single dollar just to get by.

If that $26.7 billion in bonuses went to the working poor, instead of the gamblers on Wall Street, our economy would grow by more than $32 billion. That makes a whole lot more sense than gifting billions to the very people who crashed our economy. It's time to fix this broken system, to stop rewarding the people who gamble with our economy, and time to put this money back into the hands of the real working people in America.

Comments

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#1

Answers to "age-old" questions were answered, in part, by men of logic and reason..men of science...who were burned at the stake or imprisoned by men of superstition and ignorance. It's too bad that this disease of the mind has never been cured in all people. Superstition and ignorance still thrives in people who can't, or won't, understand science. They fall for the old tricks and it can easily be the last trick they ever learn. Even Steve Jobs, Apple Founder and CEO, thought he could fight his disease with alternative medicine cures...but, obviously, it didn't work. Modern medicine could have prolonged his life yet this man who was smart enough to create a company like Apple (he was worth about $8 billion when he died) wasn't "smart?" enough to turn to real medicine instead of quack medicine. Believing in nonsense just put him in the grave much sooner than if he'd availed himself of science instead of superstition.

Quote wikipedia:
In October 2003, Jobs was diagnosed with cancer, and in mid-2004, he announced to his employees that he had a cancerous tumor in his pancreas. The prognosis for pancreatic cancer is usually very poor; Jobs stated that he had a rare, far less aggressive type known as islet cell neuroendocrine tumor. Despite his diagnosis, Jobs resisted his doctors' recommendations for medical intervention for nine months, instead consuming a pseudo-medicine diet in an attempt to thwart the disease. According to Harvard researcher Ramzi Amri, his choice of alternative treatment "led to an unnecessarily early death."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Jobs

Mark Saulys's picture
Mark Saulys 8 years 8 weeks ago
#2

Mark Saulys's picture
Mark Saulys 8 years 8 weeks ago
#3

Lemme tell ya somethin', Pali boy. I don't have a need to have everybody think as I do. I just have my opinions and that's it, you're more than welcome to yours. In fact, I'm never even convinced I'm right about anything or, at least, that I can't be wrong. I've been an atheist before, now I'm not. I actually don't know that I'm better off for not being one. I think there may well be a reason why we're not born knowing some things. Whatever works for you is whatever works for you, as far as I'm concerned. If you don't find out the truth this time maybe you will next go 'round - or maybe you don't even need to find out. Maybe it's not for you or any of us to know.

Although the near death experience is very, very common (and this is borne out by research). I've never had one but I know many, many people who have and almost all of them were very common people, many, common laborers who were barely literate and had no words for the experience and certainly weren't caught up in any New Age hype. Often they kept it to themseves for years for fear people would think they were crazy or just wouldn't understand - and yet, they felt a great need to tell people about it. Anyway Pali, follow your mind and heart where they take you - sure can't follow someone else's - and remember that everybody's not like you - and that everybody doesn't have to be. Take care buddy

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#4
Quote psychologytoday.com:That NDEs happen isn't in dispute. The sequence and type of events of which they're composed are similar enough among people who report them that NDEs could be considered a syndrome of sorts akin to a disease lacking a known cause. But just because millions of people have experienced NDEs doesn't mean the most commonly believed explanation for them—that souls leave bodies and encounter God or some other evidence for the afterlife—is correct. After all, people misinterpret their experience all the time (an optical illusion representing the most basic example). Without a doubt, many people who report NDEs are profoundly affected by them, but usually more as a result of their interpretation of the experience (i.e., the afterlife is real) than as a result of the experience itself. It turns out, however, that a number of reproducible observations combined with a bit of conjecture yield an entirely plausible neurological explanation for all the reported experiences that comprise NDEs.
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Perhaps the most intriguing aspect of NDEs is how often they're associated with out-of-body experiences. This, too, however, turns out to be an illusion. Evidence that out-of-body experiences have nothing to do with souls leaving bodies can be found in the observation that they've also been reported by people just awakening from sleep, recovering from anesthesia, while fainting, during seizures, during migraines, and while at high altitudes (there's no reason to think the souls of people are leaving their bodies during any of those non-life-threatening situations). But the most fascinating evidence that out-of-body experiences are neurological phenomena comes from studies initially performed in the 1950s by a neurosurgeon named Penfield. He was interested in figuring out how to distinguish between normal brain tissue and brain tumors or scars that were responsible for causing seizures. So he stimulated the brains of hundreds of awake patients in an effort to map the cerebral cortex and figure out where in our brains our physical body is represented.

--------------
--------------
The article goes on to show examples...go the web site and read the article if you are interested.

--------------

Quote psychologytoday.com:
Neurologists have since recognized that the temporoparietal region of the brain is responsible for maintaining our body schema representation. When external current is applied to this region, it ceases to function normally and our body schema "floats." Further evidence that this phenomenon is an illusion comes from experiments in which people who've had out-of-body experiences when transitioning from sleep to wakefulness were unable to identify objects placed in the room after they'd fallen asleep, strongly suggesting the picture they viewed of themselves sleeping in their beds was reconstructed from memory.

-------------

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/happiness-in-world/201105/the-neurol...

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#5

And by the way, there are many people who, at one time, were believers in all that hocus pocus who are now atheists. One person was a devote evangelical preacher starting when he was a young boy. He totally believed and spent his young adult life very active in trying to proselytize other people into his religious belief system. He was also a very talented music composer and pianist who composed religious songs...many for children. Many are still sung today by religious groups. As he continued to study and read a diverse and broad spectrum of literature...he came to realize the problem with believing the way he did before...and now is an atheist. He, along with his atheist wife formed an organization that fights religion bullies who push their beliefs system on the public by violating the separation of church and state. The Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) has a web site: www.ffrf.org

Mark Saulys's picture
Mark Saulys 8 years 8 weeks ago
#6

Pali, your Psychology Today article seems a typical completely biased hatchet job. The author clearly hasn't read the research by Gallup and others. One essential aspect of an NDE - and I don't know to what, if any, extent the OBE, OBE is not something I ever really studied about, it may well be, for all I know, hogwash - is that the individual undergoing an NDE commonly witnesses things happening that they could not possibly otherwise from where their body is laying. This can't be dismissed as "halucinations" as skeptics initially tried to do because, as Gallup said, an halucination is a witnessing of something that is not there or not taking place, however, the NDE subjects were witnessing things that were proven, in fact, be present or events that were, in fact, taking place but at a remote distance from where the subject's body was laying. Similarly with the clairevoyance of Edgar Cayce and others.

My good friend recently adopted agnosticism after graduating Bible College and abandoned a strong committment to a devout life. (He gained a lot of respect from me when he did, has credibility and apparent integrity.) He networks with others similarly converted (to agnosticism or atheism). He was the one who coined the term "evangelical atheist" for those who have to prosyletize their belief in nothingness - which he finds annoying.

By the way, at least one - but no doubt more - or Gallup's subjects was an atheist before his NDE but is no more as a result of it.

Mark Saulys's picture
Mark Saulys 8 years 8 weeks ago
#7

I'm all for freedom from religion - including that of the atheists. The solution to intolerance is tolerance not an opposite intolerance.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 8 weeks ago
#8

The problem with NDE's are the N. Correct me if I am wrong, but as I understand it no one has ever been revived after brain death. If the brain is still alive and active so is the mortal consciousness to some extent. Though there may indeed be some transitional death affect on the unconscious mind at the time of death no one really knows for sure if that conscious will continue after brain death. I guess that is just a question that we will have to wait and find out on our own when the time comes. Nevertheless, the phenomenon of NDE's is quite promising and intriguing.

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 8 weeks ago
#9

Palin -- your devil sounds like the spaghetti monster.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 8 weeks ago
#10
Quote Mark Saulys:I'm all for freedom from religion - including that of the atheists. The solution to intolerance is tolerance not an opposite intolerance.

Mark Saulys ~ Very well said!

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 8 weeks ago
#11
Quote Mark Saulys:Look into the documentation of Edgar Casey's clairevoyance and that of others'.

Mark Saulys ~ I hate to be the "Palindromedary" advocate; but, after rereading your former post I couldn't help but notice you mentioned Edgar Casey. I've studied his work and it is most fascinating. It appears that he predicted massive earth changes for the turn of the century that, because of global warming, we may actually some day experience. Yet when he predicted them we had no clue that such events might occur or why.

My only problem with Casey is that he predicted that Japan and most of the western US would go into the sea by the turn of the century. This hasn't happened yet. I tend to discredit prophecy that doesn't occur exactly how and when it is prophesied to occur. Nevertheless, as only a prediction, the forecast is ominous and provocative. However, if failed miserably the test of prophecy.

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 8 weeks ago
#12

Marc, I thought this discussion was over.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 8 weeks ago
#13

Aliceinwonderland ~ Very good point. Please ignore my last posts everyone. Good night! Big sister says I gotta go in now. See ya all on the next blog.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#14

chuckle8: my "devil" just might be me... so as it is with the Flying Spaghetti Monster...lord and savior of the whole pasta world. Devils, monsters, gods, demons...they are, after all, merely manifestations within one's mind. At least, that's how I see it...but, of course, I could be wrong. ;-}

Good point, DAnnemarc! When you're brain dead, you are really dead. You can't really "come back from the dead" when you are brain dead. So no one, who has crossed that threshold, can "come back" to tell their story. And that brain, prior to brain dead, experienced the same kind of dream state...as in vivid dreams that seemed so real. And it is known that prior beliefs or prior sensorial experiences can trigger the subconscious mind into conjuring up various influenced "dreams".

There are several levels of consciousness. Some people under the influence of various drugs can experience things that they would not have in a fully conscious state.

Meditation can bring about a state of complete relaxation and the feeling like you are immobile..numb..unable to move unless you really forced it. You would be conscious of your surroundings, knowing that you could break this state if you tried. But, perhaps, you marvel at the feeling at the numbness of your complete body. You're fully aware of the sensation of numbness in the feet, legs, arms, face...the whole body. It's like you are asleep, yet fully awake. It's hard to describe the sensation fully. You can watch things that happen in the room while being numb and motionless. Of course, my eyes are open and I can move my eye balls but nothing else. I know this because I have done this a few times when meditating with hemi-sync© music. It didn't happen the first few times but eventually it happens. It is a rather eerie feeling but not really scarey. Just another something that I found was interesting to explore. But, I haven't done it for quite sometime now.

You know, some doctors actually use hemi-sync© music for their patients when undergoing operations. Especially if they are doing minor operations with local anesthetics. It helps calm the patient.

I used the term hemi-sync©: I believe it is a copyright name by the Monroe Institute...but I could also be referring to non-Monroe Institute products..names like brainwave entrainment or binaural beat frequency products.

I have read some interesting claims that I would not particularly vouch for. For example: Visiting other alien plains...seeing aliens..and other wild claims..seeing dead relatives..etc...during sessions. Again, you may just experience things that you tend to believe in...whether it be aliens or long-dead family members at the end of a tunnel of light.

None of my, close to, 100 CDs have ever let me do anything other than what I just described about my experience with it...just a deep relaxation...with those beat frequencies that enhances that condition. Other frequencies help with concentration. Others creativity. Others can put you into a very deep sleep..etc.

I rather like the idea of trying float tanks while listening to this music as well. I was going to build one once out of plywood lined with 3 inch thick foam insulation and lined with a waterbed liner along with a waterbed temperature control ....but haven't done it yet. I even found a supplier of 100 pound bags of Epsom salts to put into the water. It would take a number of these depending upon the size of the tank. It is also called an isolation tank. Floating in near body temperature-controlled Epsom salt water that keeps you from sinking sounds like you would get the maximum amount of relaxation. A feeling like you are floating in space (sans the absolute zero temperature, of course).

I might come out of the isolation chamber one day, being reduced to a primitive ape just out of our prehistoric past. ;-} references to a movie I once saw about float tank isolation chambers...movie: Altered States.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#15

Movin' on...good idea!

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 8 weeks ago
#16

Aw c'mon PD... Give it a rest!

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 8 weeks ago
#17

Aliceinwonderland ~ Sorry. One last thing I want to share.

I remember clearly some 15 years ago when my mother was dying in the hospital. She was suffering from heart failure. My father and I went to visit her together toward the end. She told us that the night before she was visited by a host of dead relatives. She described it in detail. Some of the relatives were dead for over 30 years. We were both in shock. However, she then went on to add that she was also visited by relatives that weren't quite dead yet; and, who lived some 500 miles away. I remember looking my father in the eye with that look that only says, "We lost her. She's gone."

I remember thinking that an experience that almost reinforced my belief in the supernatural actually was the ramblings of someone who was suffering from too much drugs and heart failure.

However, Palindromedary, my own spiritual experiences--which I have already shared on this blog for all to see--have convinced me otherwise. There is a slight possibility that they may be random chance; but, statistically in these cases, random chance is an unrealistic explanation that I don't buy. The fact of the matter is that there is more to the human spirit than the corporeal; and, no amount of bullying or insults on your part are going to change that fact as far as I am concerned. If you persist on not recognizing that fact I could'nt care less. Good night, my friend. Sweet dreams. Sleep tight! Don't let the bed bugs bite.

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 8 weeks ago
#18

Palin -- I had no clue about the Flying Spaghetti Monster until Thom described it a couple of months ago. You probably know, but if you don't the salient point is that the religion of the flying spaghetti monster says that the FSM manually changes all the measurements that scientists take. Thus everything one derives from science is wrong.

Have you read the book "Why God Won't Go Away -- Brain Science and the Biology of Belief" by Andrew Newberg, Eugene D'Aquili, and Vince Rause? I think it is interesting how religious practices effect the activity of the brain.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#19

Philosopher Bertrand Russell's Teapot.

Quote wikipedia:In an article titled "Is There a God?" commissioned, but never published, by Illustrated magazine in 1952, Russell wrote:

Many orthodox people speak as though it were the business of sceptics to disprove received dogmas rather than of dogmatists to prove them. This is, of course, a mistake. If I were to suggest that between the Earth and Mars there is a china teapot revolving about the sun in an elliptical orbit, nobody would be able to disprove my assertion provided I were careful to add that the teapot is too small to be revealed even by our most powerful telescopes. But if I were to go on to say that, since my assertion cannot be disproved, it is intolerable presumption on the part of human reason to doubt it, I should rightly be thought to be talking nonsense. If, however, the existence of such a teapot were affirmed in ancient books, taught as the sacred truth every Sunday, and instilled into the minds of children at school, hesitation to believe in its existence would become a mark of eccentricity and entitle the doubter to the attentions of the psychiatrist in an enlightened age or of the Inquisitor in an earlier time.[1]

In 1958, Russell elaborated on the analogy as a reason for his own atheism:

I ought to call myself an agnostic; but, for all practical purposes, I am an atheist. I do not think the existence of the Christian God any more probable than the existence of the Gods of Olympus or Valhalla. To take another illustration: nobody can prove that there is not between the Earth and Mars a china teapot revolving in an elliptical orbit, but nobody thinks this sufficiently likely to be taken into account in practice. I think the Christian God just as unlikely.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell%27s_teapot

Quote wikipedia:The "Flying Spaghetti Monster" was first described in a satirical open letter written by Bobby Henderson in 2005 to protest the Kansas State Board of Education decision to permit teaching intelligent design as an alternative to evolution in public school science classes.[6] In that letter, Henderson satirized creationist ideas by professing his belief that whenever a scientist carbon-dates an object, a supernatural creator that closely resembles spaghetti and meatballs is there "changing the results with His Noodly Appendage". Henderson argued that his beliefs were just as valid as those of intelligent design, and called for Flying Spaghetti Monsterism to be allotted equal time in science classrooms alongside intelligent design and evolution.[7] After Henderson published the letter on his website, the Flying Spaghetti Monster rapidly became an Internet phenomenon and a symbol of opposition to the teaching of intelligent design in public schools.[8]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_Spaghetti_Monster
http://www.venganza.org/about/ The web site of FSM.

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 8 weeks ago
#20

Palin -- Thanks for the info. Please read some of the book "Why God Won't Go Away".

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#21

chuckle8: Or....you could read:
Godless-How an Evangelical Preacher Became One of America's Leading Atheists --by Dan Barker
Or...
Deceptions and Myths of the Bible by Lloyd M. Graham
Or...
The Christ Conspiracy-The Greatest Story Ever Sold by Acharya S.
Or...
Jesus Was Caesar-On the Julian Origin of Christianity by Francesco Carotta
Or...
Freethinkers-A History of American Secularism by Susan Jacoby
Or...
Atheism-A Philosophical Justification by Michael Martin
Or...
Caesar's Messiah-The Roman Conspiracy to Invent Jesus by Joseph Atwill
Or...
Why I Am Not A Christian by Bertrand Russel
Or...
Atheism-The Case Against God by George H. Smith
Or...
Atheist Universe-The Thinking Person's Answer to Christian Fundamentalism by David Mills
Or...
The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason by Sam Harris
Or...
God: The Failed Hypothesis-How Science Shows That God Does Not Exist by Victor J. Stenger
Or...
Losing Faith in Faith-From Preacher to Atheist by Dan Barker

And...there's a lot more!

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 8 weeks ago
#22

Here we go again...

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#23

Yes, I know...pathetic isn't it?

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 8 weeks ago
#24

Palindromedary ~ If you really, reallty, really, truly want to convince me there is no God... Bring back your little kitty cat avatar.

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 8 weeks ago
#25

You guys have contracted a severe case of debaters' diarrhea, a theological strain that is particularly virulent. The only remedy I know of is silence........ - AIW

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#26

lol-DAnneMarc! Who would ever have thought that this ancient blog back channel would still be active? I was really only trying to respond to chuckle8 and was hoping no one else would notice...I guess that was not the case. Anyway, I guess it's about time for me to say my prayers and go to bed. ;-}

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#27

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 8 weeks ago
#28

Aliceinwonderland ~ Seriously? I thought sure you'd might miss ugly Fluffy too?

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 8 weeks ago
#29

Palindromedary ~ You might also want to consider a photo of the elusive Flying Spaghetti Monster as an avatar. Then I wouldn't be able to even consider this debate without laughing ;-}

Oh well, Good Night all. Can't keep the eyes open anymore.

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 8 weeks ago
#30

Palin, Palin, Palin... hoping no one else would notice... on this open, public blog? Seriously?!

By the way Marc, I do miss Ugly Fluffy. I do I do I do. - AIW

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#31

Oh, awwwight! ;-}

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#32

This isn't ugly fluffy though..this is nice fluffy. Ugly fluffy is really scarey. I have him too! I'm not referring to my dual personality, though. ☯ ;-}

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 8 weeks ago
#33

Palindromedary ~ For being in quite an undignified position I think Nice Fluffy is one of the most dignified cats I've ever seen. Certainly, the coolest Avatar on the blog. Thanks so much for sharing him/her/it again.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#34

You're welcome! :-}

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 8 weeks ago
#35

Palin -- Based on the titles, none of those books seem to cover the same topic as "Why God Won't Go Away". I mostly want you to read that book so you can tell me what it says. My best interpretation of what it says is that a brain can operate better if it believes in god.

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 8 weeks ago
#36

Mark S -- I appreciate the light heartedness. Something I need whenever possible. The economic structure of 30's, 40's, 50's, 60's and 70's has a proven record of building the greatest economy the world has ever known. Why would we want to try co-ops, when all we need is a top tax rate of 96%, reasonable tariffs, enforcement of the anti-trust laws, no waivers for the Buy American Act of 1936, repeal of Taft Hartly Act, repeal of the law to allow pensions to be attacked under bankruptcy, etc. My real question is there any track record for the effect that co-ops have on a country's economy?

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 8 weeks ago
#37

Didn't I hear somewhere that hope is the last thing to go.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#38

chuckle8: "a brain can operate better if it believes in god".

Really? Yeah, right, and "things go better with coke"! And for some people that may be true..but I prefer RootBeer, myself. Sorry, I'm not up for being sold on any religious beliefs.

And, I'm sure you are not up for reading any of the books I mentioned, either. I have read, over the years, a number of books on religion. And I can sure detect the ones that try to proselytize people into the religious cult systems of the authors. And yes, Christianity is a religious cult that just got bigger.

And no..I was not "searching" (that's what religious people try to say..searching..as if I will one day find that their beliefs were the true ones...ha!).

I have always been Atheist, even as a young child...much to the chagrin of my mother...my father was just politically and religiously neutral....a pragmatist. He was in a public position where he tried not to tick off anyone. And my interest in reading about religion and religion's history was more from a standpoint of wondering why people would believe in such nonsense. Of course, I realize that there are many religious people who believe that what I believe is nonsense. So it goes.....

I read something pretty interesting lately on Wikipedia....about the Baghwan Shree Rajneesh...originally Chandra Mohan Jain. He also took the name Acharya Rajneesh and then finally just...Osho. Very interesting how charismatic people can entrap other people's minds and take over their will...of course... there are obviously a lot of people who are dumb enough to be taken in by people like this. And, some of those dummies were really not so dumb..some, very intelligent..some not so poor...in fact, wealthy...his followers bought him something like 90 Rolls Royce cars and they wanted to buy him 365, one for each day of the year. How many people lost their life's savings for this scoundrel? At least they didn't lose their lives like the followers of Jim Jones. Just don't drink the cool-aid!!!

These scoundrels start up these "feel good" organizations, write books, have seminars, and essentially, eventually, talk their victims out of their life's savings. Although, I thought some of his anti-establishment ideas were really admirable; but, taking advantage of people like that was not. I think he was really an atheist who took advantage of a lot of vulnerable people.

I know that a lot of people, disenchanted with western religion (I certainly don't blame them) fall for the mysterious oriental religions which are even weirder than western religions. And even Jesus (if he even existed) may have gotten oriental ideas from when he went to Egypt to study..according to some things I read...but again...Jesus may have just been a myth.

And they get taken just as much, or even more so, by western religions. As far as I am concerned all religions are nonsense...there is no good reason to believe in any of that religious or mystical stuff. People are so willing to be brain washed by hocus-pocus nonsense.

I have heard of wealthy entrepreneurs, who have sold their companies, I suppose, in order to get out of the rat race of making more and more money and just "dropping out" of the main-stream business world, perhaps going all mystical, peace and love, and starting their own non-profit organizations to serve humanity, perhaps writing books, blogging. I know that certain tragedies in life can shock one out of one's current path and put them on another...sometimes for the better...sometimes not.

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 8 weeks ago
#39

Palin -- The book I wanted you to read, "Why God Won't Go Away", is a lot more about brain science than religion. I wanted you input on the science, not the religion.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#40

Here's a quote from the Amazon.com introduction to that book 'Why God Won't Go Away'
...last sentence...
"This fascinating, eye-opening book dares to explore both the miracle and the biology of our enduring relationship with God."

"miracle"? "enduring relationship with God"?

From what I've read from the reviewer's comments about that book in Amazon.com, most of the remarks from those who gave it a high rating came from people who I'd say were religious, or some kind of superstitious beliefs, in general. And those who gave it fewer stars tended to be non-believers.

Some religious people, especially those who want to sell books on the controversy they can generate, will try to delude people that there is some scientific basis for the existence of those things. But note: the scientist authors anyway, emphasizes that they are talking about what people "experience" not that it proves the actual "existence" of God or any of the other superstitions of the people they analyzed. What it really says is that it is all in your mind. Just as any myth or cartoon character is imagined so are any of the superstitious ideas people believe in. People watching magic tricks also "experience" the illusion of magic and if they are believers they will never know that it was a trick. And yes, of course, certain brain patterns emerge even when thinking about Micky Mouse. So, what?

Some people have commented that the book starts out with simplified scientific jargon and premises. But, in the last third of the book concludes with the strong suggestion that God is real. Perhaps, the non-scientist Vince Rause, wrote that part?

The third author, Vince Rause, has only written (or co-authored) 3 books (as listed on Amazon). None of them scientific. And one was 'Miracle in the Andes' coauthored with Nando Parrado. One three-star critic said of the book: "It reminds me of how the Catholic Church writes history of saints, and it is probably no coincidence that the survivors were from Catholic backgrounds, and saints in the minds of true believers who saw the hand of God at work in this "Miracle in the Andres"."

But, I have found an old Los Angeles Times Newspaper article date 2001 written by Vince Rause about his relationship with Newberg and the book 'Why God Won't Go Away'.

"That's why religion thrives in a age of reason," Newberg says. You can't simply think God out of existence, he says, because religious feelings rise more from experience than from thought. They are born in a moment of spiritual connection, as real to the brain as any perception of "ordinary" physical reality.

"Does this mean that God is just a perception generated by the brain, or has the brain been wired to experience the reality of God?" I ask.

"The best and most rational answer I can give to both questions," Newberg answers, "is yes."

http://iws.collin.edu/mbailey/godscience1.pdf

"religious feelings rise more from experience than from thought"...

If, in the middle ages, you ate pork you could easily get a disease that will kill you. So, the Muslims and the Jews wrote that "thou shalt not eat pork" into their belief systems. It may have been sound advice a thousand, or so, years ago but is no longer very relevant today. And that belief system has clung on as a matter of holy writ ever since. Superstitious belief systems tend to hang on their old worn out beliefs until science proves that it is nonsense. That's why we fly in airplanes, have modern medicine that cures most of the old diseases that killed many people hundreds or thousands of years ago.

"you can't simply think God out of existence"?
Oh, but you can simply think God into existence...that's ok...huh
What if I said "you can't simply think @#$ into existence"? That's really pretty nonsensical isn't it?

The religious belief systems have even adapted to science out of necessity. Yet, the proponents of superstitious thinking still fight science even to the point that they try to misuse and abuse science in their rhetoric. The Scientific Creationists are constantly trying to confuse people by using scientific terms and all manner of psychological trickery to win people who don't understand science to their superstitious belief systems. They are as dishonest as the example they give of the devils, they believe exists, that tricks man away from believing in their God. They are not being honest with others and certainly not with themselves. And it certainly helps to sell books.

If it looks like a skunk and smells like a skunk it is probably a skunk. That's why I have no wish to waste my time reading a book that has already been read by others who say that they thought that the beginning started off with the pretension of science and ending the book with a conclusion that tried to make superstitious thinking and belief systems more acceptable. ie: it was a religious proselytization hiding under the cover of science.

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 8 weeks ago
#41

Palin -- Thanks for the investigation I have not read the last half (therefore, not the last third) of the book. However, you have also made me feel stupid. I thought if was anything but "simplified scientific jargon".

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#42

chuckle8: I am sorry if I have made you feel stupid. I certainly don't think you are. I think you are quite intelligent, in fact. I don't know if it was "simplified scientific jargon" or not but that is what I read from some comments about the book on Amazon.com.

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 8 weeks ago
#43

Palin -- You're right, it wasn't you that made me feel stupid. It was that commentator in Amazon.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 8 weeks ago
#44

;-}

Gary Reber's picture
Gary Reber 8 years 6 weeks ago
#45

Yes, our economic system is broken and in need of serious reform.

The capitalism practiced today is what, for a long time, I have termed “Hoggism,” propelled by greed and the sheer love of power over others. “Hoggism” institutionalizes greed (creating concentrated capital ownership, monopolies, and special privileges). “Hoggism” is about the ability of greedy rich people to manipulate the lives of people who struggle with declining labor worker earnings and job opportunities, and then accumulate the bulk of the money through monopolized productive capital ownership. Our scientists, engineers, and executive managers who are not owners themselves, except for those in the highest employed positions, are encouraged to work to destroy employment by making the capital “worker” owner more productive. How much employment can be destroyed by substituting machines for people is a measure of their success––always focused on producing at the lowest cost. Only the people who already own productive capital are the beneficiaries of their work, as they systematically concentrate more and more capital ownership in their stationary 1 percent ranks. Yet the 1 percent are not the people who do the overwhelming consuming. The result is the consumer populous is not able to get the money to buy the products and services produced as a result of substituting machines for people. And yet you can’t have mass production without mass human consumption. It is the exponential disassociation of production and consumption that is the problem in the United States economy, and the reason that ordinary citizens must gain access to productive capital ownership to improve their economic well-being.

Binary economist Louis Kelso postulated: “When consumer earning power is systematically acquired in the course of the normal operations of the economy by people who need and want more consumer goods and services, the production of goods and services should rise to unprecedented levels; the quality and craftsmanship of goods and services, freed of the cornercutting imposed by the chronic shortage of consumer purchasing power, should return to their former high levels; competition should be brisk; and the purchasing power of money should remain stable year after year.”

Without this necessary balance hopeless poverty, social alienation, and economic breakdown will persist, even though the American economy is ripe with the physical, technical, managerial, and engineering prerequisites for improving the lives of the 99 percent majority. Why? Because there is a crippling organizational malfunction that prevents making full use of the technological prowess that we have developed. The system does not fully facilitate connecting the majority of citizens, who have unsatisfied needs and wants, to the productive capital assets enabling productive efficiency and economic growth.

Kelso said, “We are a nation of industrial sharecroppers who work for somebody else and have no other source of income. If a man owns something that will produce a second income, he’ll be a better customer for the things that American industry produces. But the problem is how to get the working man [and woman] that second income.”

The "how" is answered in the Agenda of The JUST Third Way Movement at http://foreconomicjustice.org/?p=5797, http://www.cesj.org/resources/articles-index/the-just-third-way-basic-principles-of-economic-and-social-justice-by-norman-g-kurland/, http://www.cesj.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/jtw-graphicoverview-2013.pdf and http://www.cesj.org/resources/articles-index/the-just-third-way-a-new-vision-for-providing-hope-justice-and-economic-empowerment/; Monetary Justice at http://capitalhomestead.org/page/monetary-justice; and the Capital Homestead Act at http://www.cesj.org/learn/capital-homesteading/capital-homestead-act-a-plan-for-getting-ownership-income-and-power-to-every-citizen/ and http://www.cesj.org/learn/capital-homesteading/capital-homestead-act-summary/.

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 6 weeks ago
#46

Gary R -- Once again, what is wrong with the economic policies/tax structure of FDR/LBJ?

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