Let's take back our land from Big Oil!

What do you do with the land that's been destroyed by the fossil fuel industry? Well, turn it in to a solar farm of course! The Maywood Solar Farm in Indiana is 43 acres, and it's made up of 36,000 solar panels. And, it sits on the site of a former coal tar refinery plant, which was designated as a Superfund site by the EPA. Back in the 1980s, environmental regulatory officials found that the groundwater beneath that plant was contaminated with dangerous chemicals, and ruled that the property could no longer be used.

However, thanks to the EPA's new Superfund Redevelopment Project, that land is now one of 85 renewable energy projects that together produce 507 megawatts of clean, renewable power. And, toxic sites in Georgia, North Carolina, and Massachusetts could soon be doing the same. It's nearly impossible to undo the damage that chemical plants and fossil fuel development does to our environment, but this is a great way to make use of the land that they've destroyed. We should be expanding this program all over the country and breathing new life into devastated land by building solar and wind plants in every area that these industries have destroyed.

Comments

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 5 years 37 weeks ago
#1

Marc says "When you get down to it, energy is really a far greater concern for national security than violating the Constitution." Respectfully, I disagree. There's enough room for 'em both at the top of that heap…

I look at it this way: it doesn't really matter whether constitutional violations or drilling & tracking are more directly linked to our demise, because in the end, it's the same end result. We're still dead. So before that happens, let's try for that new amendment to the Constitution so we can have "Citizens United" overturned. Then at long last, maybe we can start gettin' some serious stuff done. - Alice IW

ChicagoMatt 5 years 37 weeks ago
#2

Actually, Parochial school teachers like myself make about half of our public school counterparts. Less, pay, much less red tape and more freedom to actually teach. All of that "teaching to the test" BS the public school teachers have to deal with (A Bush policy I disagree with) - doesn't apply to private schools. I also avoid joining a union this way.

But yes, like most private school teachers, I am a distant second income to my spouse.

But I never said my $70,000 was income taxes alone. There are also the property and sales taxes to consider.

ChicagoMatt 5 years 37 weeks ago
#3
By the way, nice avatar of Niccolo (sometimes spelled Nicolo) Machiavelli! What a Prince, eh? That avatar is popular with about 40+ others according to tineye.com

Thank you. I was looking for a close up of Cicero, where he is on trial, but I couldn't find it. I have a copy of the bigger painting of it, and I always liked it. I first read Machiavelli in college. I was considering using Reagan as my photo, but I thought that might be going a little too far... :)

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 5 years 37 weeks ago
#4

Matt, if you're paid less than the paltry salary of a public school teacher and your taxes are $70,000, your wife must be a brain surgeon.

You're right about that "teaching to the test" bull crap, one of the many gifts Baby Bush left for us to remember him by. But after all, what else could we expect with a flunky from Yale in the White House? His grades were so bad, they're under lock and key. Stupid is as stupid does, like ole Forrest Gump used to say... - AIW

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 5 years 37 weeks ago
#5
Quote Aliceinwonderland: I look at it this way: it doesn't really matter whether constitutional violations or drilling & tracking are more directly linked to our demise, because in the end, it's the same end result. We're still dead.

Aliceinwonderland ~ Very good point! I agree.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 5 years 37 weeks ago
#6

I know that Cicero, being an orator and lawyer, attended trials but was he ever put on trial where he was present, the outcome of which resulting a guilty verdict and death sentence? I thought Cicero's head and hands were cut off by assassins when he was caught trying to escape from the wrath of Mark Antony who was trying to atone for the assassination of Julius Caesar. Cicero was sympathetic to the assassins of Julius Caesar but Mark Antony proscribed death sentences for anyone who was sympathetic to the JC, "Ides of March", assassination.

By the way, I've been to Brindisi, Italy which is where Cicero returned to Italy after his self-imposed exile (ie: escape before they could kill him). I remember climbing those steps leading up from the Adriatic Sea.

Cicero made lots of powerful friends and enemies and walked a tightrope between popularity and choosing the wrong powers to align with. He was not born into wealth and power, in fact he was a semi-invalid, which is one reason he spent so much time studying...especially the Greek language. But by learning Greek and other languages, and acting as an interpreter, which was all the rage in those days in Rome among the ruling elite, he became very popular. His popularity increased when he became a lawyer and an orator. But toward the end, he made some terrible mistakes and powerful enemies.

There is a photo of a bust of Cicero here:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/23/CiceroBust.jpg/...

There is a painting of him, as a prosecutor, in accusing Gaius Verres, a provincial governor, of corruption:
http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/verres/ciceroaccusesr.jpg

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 5 years 37 weeks ago
#7

Jeez Palin, what a quarrelsome species we humans are! Next time I REINCARNATE (ahem...), I'm coming back as a macaw parrot. Like I said in my bio, they live as long as us, they're a lot smarter and they can fly. - AIW

ChicagoMatt 5 years 37 weeks ago
#8
Matt, if you're paid less than the paltry salary of a public school teacher and your taxes are $70,000, your wife must be a brain surgeon.

Close. Without going into details, since it's nobody's business, we rank in the top 20% of incomes in the USA, according to the online calculator I just checked. I suppose I should feel guily about that? I don't. I know how hard I worked to get this. I know I was born into a family that lived just above the poverty line. I'm not quite to the "owning a boat" level yet, but I don't hate the people who do own them.

And yeah! Something we can agree on! Too much testing in education.

I always tell my students, who only have to take one standardized test per year, that it is really a test of my teaching ability, not them.

ChicagoMatt 5 years 37 weeks ago
#9

Actually, you could probably help me with this. I have a painting that I found when we were cleaning out my late grandfather's garage years ago. It's all I kept of his. It has a plaque on it that says "The Trial of Cicero". Here is what it looks like:

http://d1435t697bgi2o.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Maccari-...

Mine isn't in color. But anyway, in that painting, which one is Cicero? I always thought he was the one on the right, the one who is being tried.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 5 years 37 weeks ago
#10

I believe you are referring to the painting that is posted on
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cicero

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Maccari-Cicero.jpg

which is captioned: Cicero Denounces Catiline, fresco by Cesare Maccari, 1882–88 ..I assume that Cicero is the one standing on the left and Catiline is the sitting one..looking like a whipped dog...on the right. The picture is 300pixels by 187pixels. But other than using a software program like GIMP (I'm all for free stuff ;-} )to select specific features, and I doubt it would be very clear, it would be an extremely lucky find on the internet. Maybe all you have to do is take a digital photo of your picture, cropping it down yourself. Then you can use that digital photo as an avatar.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 5 years 37 weeks ago
#11

By the way, I believe it is not a good thing to click on just any link..especially ones that direct you to their private web sites...like ones with "cloudfront.net/wp-content" which I believe the wp stands for Word Press because there are tools available for actually spying on visitors to the site...like WASSUP.

"There is a fancy "Visitors Details" view with search capability, view filters, plus a chart and top ten summary, that allows you to see almost everything about your visitors and what they do on your site.

There is an ajax "Spy" view (like Digg Spy) that lets you monitor and geolocate your visitors, live.

There is a "Current Visitors Online" view that shows a summary of your online visitors in real-time."

https://wordpress.org/plugins/wassup/

So, if you use Wordpress, among others, all you would have to do is to get someone to click on your link and it can be used to spy on them. I try not to fall for it. I don't find it a problem to click on links from major web sites but if it looks like I'm being channeled to a private one, I won't click on them.

I would click on links like the two I just posted on my previous entry because they are not "private" web sites. And even then, on major web sites, I take precautions to block information being gathered. It's not fool proof by any means. Hackers can still most likely get into my computer but I try to make it not easy for them. And data miners may still be able to breach my computer but about the only way to be totally safe is to not even be on the internet.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 5 years 37 weeks ago
#12
Quote Palindromedary:By the way, I believe it is not a good thing to click on just any link..especially ones that direct you to their private web sites...like ones with "cloudfront.net/wp-content" which I believe the wp stands for Word Press because there are tools available for actually spying on visitors to the site...like WASSUP.

Palindromedary ~ The same thought occured to me. Therefore, I second your comment!

ChicagoMatt 5 years 37 weeks ago
#13

Yup that's the one. I used to feel like Catiline all of the time when I was in college and would try to say anything that wasn't liberal. I thought the guy sitting down was Cicero though. I need to find out what Catiline's crime was before I go making it my picture. Could be something unintentionally embarassing, like beastiality or something.

Also, I understand your hesitancy to click links like that. My bad. I just picked the first one I saw on google images. And, like I think we've estabished, people like me just kind of assume we are being tracked no matter what, for marketing purposes. To worry that the government is tracking you for some reason seems, to me at least, somewhere between paranoid (the p-word again) and self-centered. Like, "I am so important that it is worth people's time to track me." Or maybe I just have really low self-esteem and don't see why anyone would care what I look up, think, etc...

I told my therapist once that I got nervous walking through the lunchroom when I was in high school, because I thought everyone was staring at me. She told me that was very self-centered of me to think that everyone cared that I was even in the room. The way she phrased it made a lot of sense to me. It's kind of the same with electronic tracking.

That being said, I do cover my webcam with tape. Because I have a teenage daughter, and I know all about Remote Access Tools. I am more concerned about perverts then marketers or the NSA or whatever government agencry wants to check out my laptop.

Did you study ancient Rome in college, or learn all of this interesting stuff by yourself?

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 5 years 37 weeks ago
#14

I believe he, along with others, tried to overthrow the Republic.

Did I study it in College? No, but I did stay in a Holiday Inn last night! ;-]

Actually, the internet is a great source of information.

Yes, I try to be careful by attempting to make it harder for marketing pests and scam artists to get my information. But, I am more concerned about someone out there on the internet who may not like what I have said and could come gunning for me.

Maybe I should be more polite sometimes but I usually try to match other people's politeness with my own. And I feel that if they can foist their beliefs on me then I should also have the same right. Certain people seem to think that certain topics, while they throw out their own beliefs on those topics, expect others to not have any countervailing views on the subject. I think that people who try to proselytize others in a public forum should be open to having their views challenged. People challenge my views all the time...and that is just fine. I have no problem with that. Some subjects just cannot be proven one way or the other because they are not falsifiable. There is just no real evidence to support their beliefs.

I am also not happy about the government spying on us. But, I know that the government already has all kinds of information on us and that will never go away. Just being in the service... with a top secret clearance, and then working in sensitive civilian jobs after that which required a top-secret crypto clearance that got me into many government installations like the Pentagon, the CIA, DIA, NSA and others...leaves a trail of personal information that they will have forever. Funny though, how other bits (whole warehouses full) of information conveniently gets destroyed by them. Information that would upset people if they could read it or view it for themselves.

True, most of us are not that important for the government to come after us...unless we're being a real thorn in their side. Someone like Chris Hedges or Laura Poitras or Glenn Greenwald, perhaps. You'd have to be on the level of say... Michael Hastings who was instrumental in ruining a top General's (head of the CIA no less) career or whatever else that "breaking news story was that he had the FBI harassing him for just prior to Hasting's high speed crash into a tree in LA." You'd have to have lots of condemning information like Edward Snowden, or even Sibel Edmonds, or Gary Webb, or... well... there are a lot of them.

Covering up your web cam..disconnect your microphone as well...if you can....very good ideas! A better idea is to trash all those I-phones and other mobile devices. It's not just the government that can geo-locate people...lots of weirdos out there can too. Spying on people just got so much better when social networking came into being.

I don't have a cell phone. I hate them. I can just barely stand laptops. I had to use them for work. But now I don't have to. Besides, I think cell phones give you brain cancer...unless you use an ear bud or something to keep them away from the scalp. And those tiny data entry pads can give people trigger fingers... which isn't very much fun, I hear!

Didn't you say that you are fairly large...like 6' 6"? I think most people may very well stare at people who are larger than them. Probably thinking you were a football player or something. Gee...you have a therapist? And you don't live in Hollywood? Some people may think that I should probably see one...but I'd certainly never be crazy enough to pay one. I'm not calling you crazy. I guess if you are wealthy enough then therapist fees are not much of a problem. Having $150,000 student loan to pay off would drive a lot of people a bit nuts, I think. We really need to work to change that...maybe you might even get reimbursed for it if the laws change.

ChicagoMatt 5 years 37 weeks ago
#15

Hm. So should I use him for my picture? I'm not trying to overthrow the Republic, just leave the Republic out of my business (by which I mean paycheck).

And yes, I am 6'6". A full four inches taller than my father was in his prime. And, sincerely, I blame all of the hormones companies are feeding animals. Of course, I realized this too late. I was done growing vertically by then. It used to be rare to see someone my height. Now I feel like I see them a lot more often. We give each other the "nod", like it's some secret club we're in.

And I don't have a therapist anymore. I went to one for a few years when I lived in a suburb where the city offered one at a reduced rate. Local government doing what it should - helping it's local citizens. It was only $20 per session, since I lived within the city limits.

Covering up your web cam..disconnect your microphone as well...if you can....very good ideas! A better idea is to trash all those I-phones and other mobile devices. It's not just the government that can geo-locate people...lots of weirdos out there can too. Spying on people just got so much better when social networking came into being.

Everytime you take a picture on a cell phone with GPS, your location in embedded into the picture. That's why I can't take a photo of my Cicero painting to use as my picture here. I need to find one already taken online.

According to some of Snowden's leaked files, I believe, the government has the ability to log into your computer and read your files EVEN IF YOUR COMPUTER ISN'T ON. That's some freaky tinfoil hat stuff for sure. But, whoever is in charge of tracking me for the government must be very bored by now.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 5 years 37 weeks ago
#16

ChicagoMatt: The EXIF metadata on photos can be easily removed. There are a lot of free programs available on line to do that. Irfanview is one very popular program to view photos and with the correct plug-in you can wipe or change the metadata.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 5 years 37 weeks ago
#17

ChicagoMatt: I know that the government has used a number of methods to sneak into people's computers. I don't see how they can do it with the computer off, unless they can remotely turn it on...which is possible...especially if you leave your modem on. But they may have already hacked our modems to remotely turn them on as well. If you want to help minimize intrusion...never leave your computer on all the time..and turn off your modem when you are not going to be on-line. Unplug the phone line to it. I know they can remotely modify the configuration data within the modem and can gain access to a computer's data if the computer is on. Some new models of modems now ask you to upgrade the modem by going to their web site...and it has been found that they take control of your modem so that you cannot have a superuser password that will lock them out..giving them fee access anytime they want. They would be able to change the configuration of your modem settings any time they wanted.

They can also sneak into your house when you are not there and copy the contents of your hard drives..they don't even need to turn your computer on for that. They have special teams to do this and they even carry their own house dust and various shades of touch-up paint and other things to cover up any disturbance they may cause that would tip you off to their having been there. They can even delay your return home so it gives them time to move out. They can plant pin-hole surveillance cameras, that would be very hard for most people to detect, overlooking your computer keyboard and monitor or anywhere else in the house. They have even been intercepting shipments of PCs and modems between the manufacturer and the merchants and loading spyware in them.

They can either install a hardware dongle that looks just like a normal connector connecting between devices on your computer...like between the keyboard and computer to either collect keystrokes or broadcast them to the street where they would be monitoring. But, of course, software keystroke loggers can also be used by getting them into your computer over the internet. They can monitor everything you type into your keyboards. I don't like wireless keyboards for that reason...what can go out wirelessly..like bluetooth..whatever...can be intercepted easily.

I never bank on-line...don't even have any bank data on my computer. Because I know that even though it is supposed to be encrypted between you and the bank. Hackers can use Man-in-the-Middle attacks and steal your information, your identity, and then your money.

ChicagoMatt 5 years 37 weeks ago
#18
I never bank on-line...don't even have any bank data on my computer. Because I know that even though it is supposed to be encrypted between you and the bank. Hackers can use Man-in-the-Middle attacks and steal your information, your identity, and then your money.

I've had fraudulent charges made on my credit cards three times in my life. the first time, the company caught it a day later and called me about it. The person was able to get the mechandise with my credit numbers (a $600 television, if I recall), but I was not personally responsible for that. They just issued me a new card. The other two times, I got a call immediately that something way up. They asked if I was trying to make a purchase, I said no, and that was that. The person didn't get the mechandise.

Which is actually one of the benefits of being tracked by companies like VISA. They know where I live, know where I shop. If something outside of my normal routine comes along, like purchases in different states, they know and can check it out.

Once I used a credit card while in Vegas, and ALL of my cards were frozen until I called to confirm it was me.

Of course, it is in their best interested to keep fraud down. As far as I know, no one is legally liable for fraud like that. It's more of an annoyance and a lot of time to fix.

THPfan 5 years 34 weeks ago
#19

With people even like Pat Sajak spreading the dangerous big oil propaganda what chance do we have ?

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