Dick Cheney Should be Rotting in The Hague, Not Writing Editorials

If there’s one person who has absolutely zero business criticizing anyone for how they’re running the country, it’s Dick Cheney. This should be obvious to pretty everyone by now, but apparently the Wall Street Journal didn’t get the message. Today, the paper published an editorial by Cheney and his daughter Liz in which the former Vice President blasts the “collapsing Obama doctrine” of foreign policy.”

Taking the rapid advance of ISIS radicals through northern Iraq as his cue, Cheney accuses President Obama of “emboldening” America’s enemies. He writes:

Rarely has a U.S. president been so wrong about so much at the expense of so many. Too many times to count, Mr. Obama has told us he is ‘ending’ the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan - as though wishing made it so. His rhetoric has now come crashing into reality...America's enemies are not ‘decimated.’ They are emboldened and on the march.

According to Cheney, the “failures” of the Obama presidency - which I guess are to not get the country involved in any more decade-long wars - are proof that our first African-American president is actively trying to take down America. He writes:

Despite clear evidence of the dire need for American leadership around the world, the desperation of our allies and the glee of our enemies, President Obama seems determined to leave office ensuring he has taken America down a notch. Indeed, the speed of the terrorists' takeover of territory in Iraq has been matched only by the speed of American decline on his watch.

Forget for a second that President Obama has continued many of the policies of the Bush administration - the drone wars and NSA spying both started under Cheney’s watch - and just consider the fact that Dick Cheney of all people actually has the gall to call someone else out for “taking America down a notch” and “being so wrong about so much at the expense of so many.”

You don’t need a political science degree to know how ridiculous this is. The Iraq War was the single biggest foreign policy disaster in recent - or maybe even all - of American history. It cost the country around $4 trillion dollars, killed hundreds of thousands, if not millions of innocent civilians, left 4,500 Americans dead, and turned what was once one of the more developed countries in the Arab World into a slaughterhouse.

Make no mistake about it, Iraq would not be the violent place it is today if the Bush administration hadn’t lied its way into a costly, unnecessary, and destructive war. Ironically, things have played out exactly as Cheney said they would when he was asked back in the 1990s about why the first Bush administration didn’t march all the way to Baghdad during the First Gulf War.

Really, there’s no one who’s done more to damage America’s reputation around the world and embolden our enemies than our former Vice President. The Iraq War was the best Al Qaeda propaganda video ever, and whatever Cheney might say about the surge and how successful it was, the truth is that there were no terrorists in Iraq before we invaded.

But Cheney’s hypocrisy on Iraq is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to all the reasons why he’s probably the worst person ever to listen to for advice on, well, everything. Remember, Cheney was the guy who almost bankrupted Halliburton by exposing it to asbestos liabilities and then used his position as Vice President of the United States to bail the company out with no-bid contracts during the Iraq War, all while owning millions in Halliburton stock options.

Remember, Cheney was the guy who played a key role in the Bush administration’s illegal torture program. You know - the illegal torture program that was based on tactics invented by Maoist China and turned our country into a pariah state. And remember, Cheney was the guy who was supposed be on the lookout for terrorist attacks in the summer of 2001, but was too busy plotting out ways to attack Iraq to listen to warning after warning about how Al Qaeda was about to kill thousands of Americans.

Cheney let 9/11 happen on his watch.

American history has had its share of villains - J. Edgar Hoover, Joe McCarthy, and Richard Nixon come to mind as some of the worst - but there is no one in recent history who has disgraced our country quite like Dick Cheney has. He lied his way into an illegal war, profited off that war, and shredded the Constitution. He’s a war criminal and has the blood of hundreds of thousands of innocent people on his hands.

Dick Cheney should be rotting in a prison cell at The Hague, not writing editorials for the Wall Street Journal.

Comments

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 14 weeks ago
#1

With regards to patting on the back, I thought the only person on this blog that I have a hard time finding a disagreement with ss AIW.

ChicagoMatt 8 years 14 weeks ago
#2

Palin - of all of the regulars here, you seem the most worried when it comes to electronics and government snooping. That's why I thought of you.

ChicagoMatt 8 years 14 weeks ago
#3
Do you have any examples where the profit motive may have helped?

Besides the one I mentioned with the internal defibrillator that kept my father alive an extra two years, I think pretty much any heart procedure, cancer treatment, obesity surgery, etc... can be traced back to the profit motive. Why are there so many options when it comes to heart disease? Because there's a big market for it. Why are there so few options when it comes to rare diseases? There is no money in it.

In fact, the government had to build in a profit motive for rare disease research:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orphan_Drug_Act_of_1983

I guess I've been pretty lucky so far in that all of my problems have been common ones, with lots of treatment options. All of them provided by different companies in competition for all of the "customers" with the same health issue.

Thom occasionally asks`if there is anyone who actually is worth a billion dollars based on their contribution to society.
Someone should tell Thom that it's not his place to determine other people's worth to society. It's kind of a dangerous precident. That's not too far away from determining someone is "worthless" to society.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 14 weeks ago
#4

Chicago Matt: Ok, Me Comprende!

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 14 weeks ago
#5

Chi Matt -- As a member of "We the People" it certainly is Thom's place to state his opinion on what people's worth to society is. We the People should determine if the appropriate profit motives are being given by our economic system. Based on our current healthcare system I think we could easily come to the conclusion that the profit motive should not be applied to our healthcare system; especially, the healthcare insurance part of our healthcare system.

Thom has pointed out that most new medical devices are being invented by Germany, and most new medicines (not those that make a molecular change to protect patents) are coming from Switzerland.

Have you heard Thom's description of how most of the VA's current problems were caused by the introduction of profit motive into waiting list accounting?

ChicagoMatt 8 years 14 weeks ago
#6

Most of the numbers I can find online say that around 500,000 people work for health insurance companies. It's not just the CEOs who make money from them. That's 500,000 families who get at least some - but probably most - of their income through this system that you think shouldn't even exist.

Based on our current healthcare system I think we could easily come to the conclusion that the profit motive should not be applied to our healthcare system

Only if you focus on the negatives, which would be easy to do if you listened to too much Progressive radio. The "system" is working beautifully for more people than Thom would want you to believe. And WAY better than most government-run systems have done in this country.

Again, as always, we have totally different perspectives. I'm a full generation behind you, which means I haven't had as much exposure to the healthcare system. I know I sound like an arrogant prick who thinks his body is going to be this good forever. I know what's in store for me. I just don't think it's so bad as to warrant risking all of the positives for the chance at something better. Because once that attempt at a better, single-payer system happens, there's no going back, no matter how bad it is. It's like trying to un-bake a cake at that point.

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 14 weeks ago
#7

You're right, Matt. We think for-profit health "insurance" companies should not even exit. They are not providing anything of value to health care, or to those receiving health care; their function is to minimize care to maximize profits, which brings zero benefits to healthcare providers and their patients. I don't give a rat's ass that this system employs hundreds of thousands of workers, or that it is supposedly working "beautifully" for some people. It is killing nearly fifty thousand other people each year. That is enough reason, by itself, to justify putting an end to this extortion racket once and for all.

Many of these people who say the system is working great for them haven't had a crisis. Once they do, they just might find out it isn't working so "great" after all. - Aliceinwonderland

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