Big Business is hoarding their cash!

The stock market keeps hitting record highs, but big businesses aren't putting those profits back into our economy. A recent article in the New York Times said that corporate investment still hasn't bounced back to precrisis levels, let along made up for the lost ground from the record lows of 2009. If firms would invest at the same levels that they did during the previous decade, they could boost our economy by about $220 billion dollars annually, and possibly create another two million jobs.

When a business buys a new piece of equipment, they immediately provide more income to the manufacturer. However, they also make it easier for that manufacturer to hire more workers, and they make their own employees more productive. That single purchase has a ripple effect throughout our economy, but it doesn't happen when corporations hoard their cash. According to the New York Times, there is little incentive to purchase new equipment to improve productivity when businesses can easily get more cheap labor. As wages go up and fewer people are looking for jobs, that new equipment starts to look like a better deal.

Congress has the ability to encourage this investment through tax policy, but many of our lawmakers have no real interest in stimulating the economy. Republicans think slow growth and high unemployment are a great excuse to cut taxes, despite the fact that lower rates have never given us the economic boost that they predicted. In fact, we need to do the exact opposite to fix this problem. We need a progressive tax system that encourages investments over dividends. Let's take our economy back, and force big business to put the needs of our nation ahead of corporate greed.

Comments

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 19 weeks ago
#1
Quote Palindromedary:Anyway, I believe OU812 had said he went to the University of Maryland. He must have had Mr. Valentine (remember him?) as a teacher.

Palindromedary ~ Sorry, another little piece that I missed. Been quite distracted this weekend. However, I sure do remember that "adjunct" piece of work, know-it-all who showed his face on this blog just long enough for you to pick him apart like a loosely wrapped Birthday present. I would have liked to have thought East coast schools had a little more integrity than that. Well, if that's the kind of teachers they hire it's no wonder that this is the kind of graduates they turn out. Scratch the tour of Maryland right off my bucket list. Considering the climate I don't think I will have any problem dissuading my nephews from California from venturing that far. There are far better institutions of higher learning right here where the sun shines.

PS Why do you think Ou812 is a guy? I thought he said he was a she? Or was that a he/she? I guess I blinked and missed even more stuff. Sorry about that OU. I could have sworn you said you were a woman at one point or another. My bad.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 19 weeks ago
#2
Quote Ou812: I returned to school at age 60 and got the necessary credits to get my teaching certificate from the State of Maryland, which happens to have the best public education system in the USA. I teach because I love it. I don't need the money, I've plenty, thanks to reganomics.

Ou812 ~ The "best public education system in the USA?" If that is true we are all doomed. If the best public education system in the USA produces an educator who owes his'/her's/it's fortune to something that he/her/it can't even spell right I truly fear the future.

It's Reaganomics sweetheart, not Reganomics. I hope you don't do your assignments on that iPad. I'd chuck the bloody thing out the window if I were you.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 19 weeks ago
#3

DAnneMarc: Maybe it was Reganomics...Regan seemed to be controlling Reagan...maybe like how Cheney seemed to be controlling Bush...although, Regan wasn't a VP like Cheney. ;-}

Well, about OU812's sex...I don't really know what he/she is...I always assumed he/she was a male. I can't remember now why I thought male was the gender. If he/she said what he/she was then I guess I missed it. Doesn't matter much anyway, anyone can say they were anything on the internet.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 19 weeks ago
#4
Quote OU812:Don't just question authority, question everything.
Ok, I'll buy that! Question everything. But pay particular attention to Questioning authority!

I'm glad to hear that your students impressed you as being respectful. That's not always the case everywhere.

As far as "sitting around waiting to die" well I guess I am. But I spend most of my time sitting at the computer leaning new things...and I'm having lots of fun doing it. It takes my mind off of the inevitable.

Ou812's picture
Ou812 8 years 19 weeks ago
#5

:))

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 19 weeks ago
#6

I know, Marc. So endearing. Gives me this nice warm & fuzzy feeling all over.

Ou812's picture
Ou812 8 years 19 weeks ago
#7

Posted at 12:01 AM ET, 01/12/2012Maryland schools ranked number one — againBy

Maryland’s public school system achieved top-in-the-nation status for thefourth consecutive year, according to an analysis of state-by-state education policies and student achievement being released Thursday.

The state was given an overall grade of B-plus by Education Week, which publishes the annual report. The average grade for the nation was a C. Virginia came in fourth with a B. And the District came in 49th, just ahead of Nebraska and South Dakota, with an overall grade of C-minus.

The evaluation includes dozens of indicators of student achievement, academic standards and accountability, teacher quality and school finance.

“Maryland is an example of an all-around strong performer,” said Chris Swanson, a vice president at Editorial Projects in Education, which publishes Education Week. The state has improving test scores, state policies that support school improvement, and comparatively high graduation rates and participation on Advanced Placement tests.

Bernard J. Sadusky, Maryland’s interim state superintendent of schools, said the accolade is a compliment to the state’s teachers and local superintendents and says much about the governor’s and legislature’s commitment to education. Still, he said, Maryland has a lot of work to do to eliminate racial and socioeconomic disparities in school performance.

A closer look at how Maryland fared in various parts of the evaluation showed strong performance overall. For example, Maryland was among the top 10 states in improving its overall scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, otherwise known as the Nation’s Report Card, between 2003 and 2011.

On the reading test, 40 percent of eighth-grade students scored proficient or advanced on the 2011 test, giving the state a seventh place ranking. (Maryland and the nation still have a lot of room to improve).

But the so-called “poverty gap,” or the difference in scores between those eligible for free lunches and those not eligible, was much less favorable.

The 27-point difference in scores was about the national average. Thirty-seven states had a narrower gap.

Forty percent of eighth-grade students in Maryland also scored proficient or advanced on the math test, putting the state in 13th place.

But the 32-point “poverty gap” in scores was significantly higher than the 26-point national average. Maryland came in second-to-last.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 19 weeks ago
#8

Aliceinwonderland ~ You sure got that right! A warm feeling all over for sure. I just hope he sticks with this one. It certainly would discourage anyone from religious conversation. Also, it's really kinda cute. It certainly works for me! Of course, I still miss that fluffy little creature from blogs gone by. But, what are you going to do?

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 19 weeks ago
#9
Quote Ou812:Posted at 12:01 AM ET, 01/12/2012Maryland schools ranked number one — againBy

Ou812 ~ Interesting reference! A name and no link to back up anything. Well, I'm certainly convinced.

However, how about a real 2012 review of college testing by the American College Testing organization called ACT. According to their website Maryland did about as well as California in across the board academic testing. However, in composite scores was clearly beat out by Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington. Hardly the best in the nation by real testing numbers at the college level. ;-P

Only by reviewing academic standards at the college level can you tell just how the state school system is doing. Poor public schools produce poor college test scores and visa versa.

http://www.act.org/newsroom/data/2012/states.html

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 19 weeks ago
#10

A father watched his daughter playing in the garden. He smiled as he reflected on how sweet and innocent his little girl was.

Suddenly she just stopped and stared at the ground. He went over to her and noticed she was looking at two spiders mating.

"Daddy, what are those two spiders doing?" she asked.

"They're mating," her father replied.

"What do you call the spider on top, Daddy?" she asked.

"That's a Daddy Longlegs," her father answered.
"So, the other one is Mommy Longlegs?" the little girl asked.

"No," her father replied. "Both of them are Daddy Longlegs."

The little girl thought for a moment, then she stomped them flat and said: "Well, it might be okay in California, Vermont, and New York, but we're not having any of that in Texas!"

http://www.sitcomsonline.com/boards/archive/index.php/t-103579.html

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 19 weeks ago
#11

Palindromedary ~ Sure, but what if they were watching a couple of heterosexual Black Widows mating? That would have really messed up that little girl's mind.

2950-10K's picture
2950-10K 8 years 19 weeks ago
#12

Limit wealth and problem solved.....or tax the crap out of outrageous income, which is stolen money from workers to begin with. We had it correct before Ronnie and Maggie times. Why the hell do people think they need so much god damn wealth.....it only leads to chaos and misery for the vast majority...always has always will.

Revolution time once again....and it's getting real old too. FFnnnn humanity, when will we learn?

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 19 weeks ago
#13

"10K", only a psychopath "needs" so much god damn wealth.

Perhaps one of the most important things we can do for future generations is document this freak show to the hilt, so they can see what happens when the 99% fall asleep at the wheel. - AIW

2950-10K's picture
2950-10K 8 years 19 weeks ago
#14

So called civilized society never gets it right. All through history, it's always about a few out of control nut jobs concentrating the wealth and power. Arrogant disfunctional upbringings can no longer be an excuse. We the 99%, need laws to limit wealth for evermore....problem solved. Democracy will thrive.

2950-10K's picture
2950-10K 8 years 19 weeks ago
#15

I'm in total agreement, as long as it is unaltered factual history. I'm no longer confident that even Livy's history of early Rome is unmolested....but that's another story.

Palindromedary's picture
Palindromedary 8 years 19 weeks ago
#16

DAnneMarc: Yeah, I tell you it sure messed up my mind! ;-}
"Two black widows mating"....good one!!!

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 19 weeks ago
#17
Quote 2950-10K:Why the hell do people think they need so much god damn wealth.....it only leads to chaos and misery for the vast majority...always has always will.

2950-10K ~ I hate to say this--because I know it won't go over well with some of our friends on this blog who will remain nameless--but, I believe the reason for this is a lack of a healthy spiritual fulfillment. Now, spiritual fulfillment doesn't have to come from religion, or belief in a deity per se. However, it does have to come from within. It has to come from self respect, and self esteem. In my opinion these are basic psychological needs. These things have to be earned by each one of us through our individual accomplishments and really have nothing to do with monetary wealth. If someone falls short of attaining these goals because of the inheritance of extreme wealth, such accomplishments seem unnecessary in life. There is no further incentive to strive to achieve them. That is when the extremely wealthy turn to material wealth for that same psychological need.

Let's face it, when a person reaches a stage of financial independence they really have no financial need to overly exceed that. All one really needs to do is to maintain it. There are many other ways to pursue happiness and inner fulfillment than making money. Making money is the most basic physical need only. Once you have all you need to survive it is natural to abandon that pursuit for more rewarding ones. However, when you are unable to obtain happiness in life any other way--or you've become accustomed to perceiving happiness as coming from material wealth--you become vastly empty inside, and need to fill that endless void with limitless wealth. Because such fulfillment is an illusion and not possible, you are endlessly trapped in a quest for greater wealth. The inner emptiness is never filled, and you are constantly in want.

In my humble opinion that is why people pursue excess wealth--because they have nothing else in life of value to them. It is a spiritual and psychological illness. A problem that can only be resolved by the victim.

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 19 weeks ago
#18

Resolved by the victim, Marc? I'm not holding my breath.

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 19 weeks ago
#19

Yeah Marc, you picked a helluva example. Imagine gettin' it on, Black Widow style! Sugar Mama happens to be ten times your size. Once you've served your purpose, you're on the menu for lunch... - AIW

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 19 weeks ago
#20

This is a most appropriate music video for this blog. Any Weird Al fans out there? Check out "Word Crimes"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Gv0H-vPoDc

2950-10K's picture
2950-10K 8 years 19 weeks ago
#21

I'm just so sick and tired of all the Richard Cory's......they can't help themselves, so it's up to we the people to do the intervention, one way or the other. Of course Ricahrd Cory put a bullet through his own head...so?

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 19 weeks ago
#22

I'm a big Weird Al fan, and that was absolutely brilliant. What a splendid work of art!

I once did a parody of Rod Stuart's "If You Want My Body". It goes: "If you want my weenie / Just come up an' see me..."

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 19 weeks ago
#23

AIW -- How far do we have to fall? I think there is a couple of historical examples you could contemplate. At the turn of century (the last one), the poverty level percentile was 90%; currently we are around 20%. The 90% poverty level was able to motivate people to do something. Teddy and Taft fiercely enforced the anti-trust laws. In 1932, the unemployment rate was around 33% (currently, we are aroung 6%). That rate motivated the people to elect an overwhelmingly democratic congress and FDR.

Those examples point out that the human species may not fit into the boiling frog analogy.

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 19 weeks ago
#24

I hope you're right, Chuck.

Mark J. Saulys's picture
Mark J. Saulys 8 years 19 weeks ago
#25

OU812, there is nuance to everything and to dismiss everyone who criticizes our current system as having a victim complex is to really broad brush it and miss the always present nuance. Lefties do sometimes take the "victim of society" shit too far (though I wouldn't put anybody on this blog in that category) but that doesn't mean there isn't genuine injustice, abuse, exploitation and victimization. The "victim complex politics" on the left occurs not too frequently but much more so than Id like it to. It comes more from upper or middle class lefty academics than the poor and working class "victims" they purport to speak for - and it pisses me off because it hurts the credibility of claims of genuine victimization in the eyes of the general public and gives a pretext for righties like you to dismiss our arguments. That's really my only problem with it. I don't think it meaningfully harms society in any way other than it hurts our movements in that way.

Incidentally, all politics in America is victimological. While we were partying in the '70s celebrating our victories of the '60s, big business and the wealthy, who were beaten back by those victories, were busy planning on how to win it all back from the people. They hatched a strategy that was implemented in the late '70s and early '80s that entailed charecterizing the rich and powerful as the victims of society - as absurd as that may seem - together with some divisive campaigns of crypto racism and stigmitization of the poor that were put with the contextual background of that new victim complex of big business and the rich high and mighty.

Big business and the rich, it was said, are egregiously put upon victims because they have to pay taxes and obey regulations that force them to contribute to - and not only take from - society - and to consider - and not harm - the well being of their fellow citizens. It's all PR sham and scam and is well documented in places like the smoking gun video - with only recently obtained audio - of Lee Atwater explicitly laying out the strategy and in the work of investgative journalists like Sheldon Rampton and John Stauber exposing of the multi billion dollar, big business PR industry.

Also OU (I ain't gonna eat one), I'd caution you from using personal anecdotes as evidence for your argument rather than publicly verifiable or at least publicly scrutinizable events and narratives as anybody can say anything here and there's no way to check it. Although none of us may say it, I guarantee you that most of us doubt the veracity some of the convenient claims of some of the commentors here whom we haven't gotten to know and trust the genuineness of - particularly when they are patently untruthful on other points.

Mark J. Saulys's picture
Mark J. Saulys 8 years 19 weeks ago
#26

Never mind - to use words of Emily LaTella of SNL.

Mark J. Saulys's picture
Mark J. Saulys 8 years 19 weeks ago
#27
Quote DAnneMarc:

Ou812 wrote:I guess humor is permitted for you, but not me. One more point, I am a teacher and I get to influence hundreds of students. Who do you influence but a bunch of washed up lefties:))

Ou812 ~ You "get to" influence hundreds of students? Spoken like a true scholar. I think that's a sure sign of the Apocolypse if I ever heard one.

Beam me up oh great spaghetti monster!

This blog is pretty widely read and has an influence on quite a relatively large number of people - as blogs go - or you wouldn't be so concerned with it, OU (I ain't gonna eat one).

Elioflight's picture
Elioflight 8 years 18 weeks ago
#28

Perhaps you don't label yourself but you have been "liberal" with the labels for others. You'll fit in nicely in the Self-Righteous Judgment of Others chapter--seems I've heard your comment millions of times before--thanks for more data.

PS. Not all liberals are nice--and we don't think that telling the truth leads to victimization.

Elioflight's picture
Elioflight 8 years 18 weeks ago
#29

A teacher? Really? Your disdain for the "intellectual" as an educator is troubling--so glad you don't teach my children and grandchildren.

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 18 weeks ago
#30

Right on Elioflight! What author couldn't use more data?

Just think back on the days, not so long ago, when we had to hear an endless stream of right-wing corporate lies, distortions and half-truths... with no way to answer them back!! Now that we have the internet and these blogs, we needn't suffer in silence any more.

Conservatives like "Ou812" add so much entertainment value to this blog. Without an ongoing supply of lame-as arguments to chew up and spit out, we'd just be high-fivin' and back-slappin'... which might be fun, but only goes so far in Blogland before it starts to get kinda redundant. But thanks to "OU", Kend, Sven, Global and a host of others, that will never happen. So c'mon assholes, make my day! - Aliceinwonderland

Mark J. Saulys's picture
Mark J. Saulys 8 years 18 weeks ago
#31

Anybody read anything I write? That's too bad, I think it's real good.

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 18 weeks ago
#32

Mark Saulys ~ I read it, Mark. I didn't comment on it because I agree with every word. Well said!

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 18 weeks ago
#33

Mark, my answer is the same as Marc's. I read and appreciated your perspective on the "victim complex" that semi-literate "educator" keeps harping on. I guess it's pretty easy to get in the habit of responding mostly to those comments we disagree with, while taking those we agree with more for granted. What you wrote is damn good and adds a whole other dimension to that part of the dialogue. - Aliceinwonderland

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 18 weeks ago
#34

Mark Saulys ~ Actually Mark, AIW is right, that was damn good and very well written. I personally really appreciate your two cents. Thanks!

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 18 weeks ago
#35

Mark S -- I thought it was "real good" also. I hope you are collecting your blogs so you can publish them.

chuckle8's picture
chuckle8 8 years 18 weeks ago
#36

Mark S -- We have so many victims if is hard not to defend them. The one thing the RW points out that no one seems to respond to is the accusation if the victims would have worked harder they would not be where they are. No one seems to say how hard do you think they should work? How smart do they have to be?

I think the underlying economic force we should look to is the law of supply and demand (duh). The key supply and demand force would be the labor force vs the corporate suppliers. With this in mind, I think the answer to how hard they should work is how hard they work when the unemployment rate is around 4%. Greenspan gave more power to the suppliers by trying to say the unemployment rate should be around 5.4%, so the workers had that level of insecurity.

Mark J. Saulys's picture
Mark J. Saulys 8 years 18 weeks ago
#37

Thanks so much for all your kind words folks, I was thinking I wasn't being heard 'cause I just didn't employ effective verbeage, i.e., I wasn't at all clear about what I was saying and was just rambling on like some irrelevant old clown. I was hoping, therefore, for people to try to read it once more and try to get past the funky wording to the basic gist of it - which I thought was worthwhile.

Should really write more clearly so people don't have to go through so much to figure it out. Sorry 'bout that. Thanks so much again, everybody, for your supportive words.

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 18 weeks ago
#38

Mark, there is nothing wrong with your choice of words. You have been an important contributor to this blog for a long time. Your background and life experience gives you a unique perspective that adds a lot to the discusson. Please don't stop! - AIW

DAnneMarc's picture
DAnneMarc 8 years 18 weeks ago
#39

Mark Saulys ~ AIW is right. You write very well and have a lot to contribute. I personally have learned a lot from you and appreciate your contribution very much; especially, in this particular thread. I'm sure she and I are not the only ones who feel that way. Please, keep up the great work. OU is full of hot air--amongst other things.

Mark J. Saulys's picture
Mark J. Saulys 8 years 18 weeks ago
#40

Okay guys, knock it off. I appreciate like hell your kind words but you don't have to keep at it. I wasn't having a personal crisis, just haven't been writing so much, thought I'd gotten out of shape or something.

I don't think I was fishing for compliments (and I hope I'm not being passive-aggressive :^)).

Thanks again for your supporting words.

You learn a lot from each of youse reading your all posts too.

Aliceinwonderland's picture
Aliceinwonderland 8 years 18 weeks ago
#41

All right Mark, you suck. Feel better now?

Thom's Blog Is On the Move

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Today, we are closing Thom's blog in this space and moving to a new home.

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