What Trump Means w/"Insurance for Everybody"

Donald Trump just made the Republican push to repeal Obamacare a whole lot more complicated.

In an interview with the Washington Post Sunday, just days after Congress set the wheels in motion for scrapping the Affordable Care Act through a filibuster-proof process called budget reconciliation, Trump said he would soon announce his own healthcare replacement plan.

That alone wasn't all that surprising - it's more or less what Trump said last week in his first press conference as president elect.

But what was surprising as how Trump described his Obamacare replacement plan. According to Trump, his replacement plan would provide for "insurance for everybody" AKA universal coverage.

As he told the Post -

"We're going to have insurance for everybody... There was a philosophy in some circles that if you can't pay for it, you don't get it. That's not going to happen with us. [People] can expect to have great health care. It will be in a much simplified form. Much less expensive and much better."

Trump has said a lot of shocking things in the two months since he was elected president - but those comments about his Obamacare replacement plan might be the most shocking.

"Insurance for everybody" or universal coverage is the worldwide gold standard for healthcare - and no country other than Switzerland has achieved it without single payer or socialized medicine.

I mean - Obamacare doesn't even provide for universal coverage.

So what's going on here?

Does Trump actually want to go beyond Obamacare?

Is he lying?

Or was this just a clever ploy to get Republicans to keep things as they are and scrap their politically disastrous plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act?

RELATED VIDEO
Is Health Care a Privilege or a Right? (w/guest Steve Beaman)

Comments

deepspace's picture
deepspace 3 years 35 weeks ago
#1

More than likely, it is none of the above. It is not that he wants to go beyond Obamacare; it is not that he is deliberately lying per se, any more than usual anyway (He just doesn't understand what the truth is.); it is not a clever ploy to keep things as they are.

What is likely spewing forth from his junk-food hole is just more nonsensical mishmash. It's a safe Irish bet that he doesn't realize the full import of universal healthcare, single payer, or the simplest and cheapest solution, which would be to use the bureaucracy already in place, ban insurance companies from operating in the primary healthcare market, and expand Medicare to include all ages.

Don't give this blowhard too much credit for making any sense or, especially, for being anything close to clever.

Oldskoold's picture
Oldskoold 3 years 35 weeks ago
#2

Lets just hope he is going to be as much a disaster to the fascist tea party republicans as he appears to be to our progressive agenda. In some respects he can hurt them more than us as far as the economy and greed are concerned. Is he really broke? If so, he has an agenda more to our liking and would really reign in the hedge fund/eletist wall street types on the economic front. I have thought he was toast many times, as most have, but somehow he pulls through. The Supreme Court nominee and his "health care for all" statement will be the litmus test. If he as as smart as he says he is, he will nominate a progressive to the court just to watch them squirm, and say the balance was necessary and dare them not to confirm he or she, and, begin the process toward single payer and call them ungodly for opposing! And..... then call them robberbarons and bandits if they start on Social Security and Medicare! Come on Mr. President "elect"; do it! You campaigned as such!

The thing that haunts me now much more than anything is his wife's (first Lady after Friday) birthplace is Europe (Romania or somewhere close) and his recent diatraubs regarding NATO. Additionally; Putin coming to his defense about the "Golden Shower crap". Are we really looking at the possibility of collusion betwixt the US and Russia attempting to take over the world? That scares the hell out of me. We are treading within the "unimajinable" now every day! May God have mercy and give some direction.......

Oldskoold's picture
Oldskoold 3 years 35 weeks ago
#3

Lets just hope he is going to be as much a disaster to the fascist tea party republicans as he appears to be to our progressive agenda. In some respects he can hurt them more than us as far as the economy and greed are concerned. Is he really broke? If so, he has an agenda more to our liking and would really reign in the hedge fund/eletist wall street types on the economic front. I have thought he was toast many times, as most have, but somehow he pulls through. The Supreme Court nominee and his "health care for all" statement will be the litmus test. If he as as smart as he says he is, he will nominate a progressive to the court just to watch them squirm, and say the balance was necessary and dare them not to confirm he or she, and, begin the process toward single payer and call them ungodly for opposing! And..... then call them robberbarons and bandits if they start on Social Security and Medicare! Come on Mr. President "elect"; do it! You campaigned as such!

The thing that haunts me now much more than anything is his wife's (first Lady after Friday) birthplace is Europe (Romania or somewhere close) and his recent diatraubs regarding NATO. Additionally; Putin coming to his defense about the "Golden Shower crap". Are we really looking at the possibility of collusion betwixt the US and Russia attempting to take over the world? That scares the hell out of me. We are treading within the "unimajinable" now every day! May God have mercy and give some direction.......

virginsnow 3 years 35 weeks ago
#4

Trump says all kinds of things. Health care to him could mean something very different than what we consider health care. It could be some kind of medicaid program with add ons. Who knows? could be basic insurance with no extras.

One thing I would like to mention is that we need to have a BIG discussion on Medicare.

Medicare is so biased and out of control it is ridiculous. It is in total control of the health insurance companies. Right now they can choose what county they want to be in and if they decide to leave--too bad for you. The prices vary from one area to another with no explanation even though coverage is the same. For example, here in California, Kaiser Permanente which advertizes itself as 5 star charges no base rate in some areas, while in others the rate can be over $90/month or more. This is in addition to the amount taken out for Medicare. This is for an advantage plan. Other companies have add on policies which do or do not have drug insurance (part d). There is also basic medicare with an assortment of expensive add ons depending on how much service one wants to get to pay for the things that medicare doesn't. these area very expensive. All of these extra plans are in addition to basic medicare. The problem is the copay rate for some of these plans, which can be 20% plus a large deductible.​ The service providers have absolute power over where they go and how much they charge. I spent months before I moved trying to find a place that was affordable and which had lower rates than I was paying with Kaiser. Ended up with a plan that is less expensive but now has a 20% copay for surgeries. Just found out I may need cataract surgery and will have to pay a lot extra because of the plan I have. There is no other advanatage plan offered in my county for medicare except those that have add ons which as I mentioned are very expensive. One more thing--they can raise their prices anytime they want.

deepspace's picture
deepspace 3 years 35 weeks ago
#5

Stay completely away from all "advantage" plans! For all the reasons you have laid out, they are nothing but insurance company rip-offs that don't give any advantage whatsoever over straight Medicare, but end up costing much more than just purchasing regular supplemental policies. You pay a lot extra for their so-called "streamlined" convenience.

Unfortunately, Republicans and their insurance industry-dirty Democratic Bobbsey twins have deliberately punched so many holes in the basic program that we victims are forced to buy private industry products. Shop around and get a good stand-alone supplemental policy. Generally, the stand-alone supplementals are all about the same, with only small differences here and there on this or that, depending on prices, which really don't vary that much either. Ditto for a stand-alone Part D policy.

It would behoove you, though, to seek outside advice somewhere else besides self-serving insurance agents and from someone you trust to help you and not themselves. A good source of honest, straight forward information is on Wendell Potter's website. I think you will be pleasantly surprised by his depth of knowledge and experience, and his hard-won integrity.

I happen to be a lifetime union member, so they go to bat for us at retirement age to come up with the best combination of basic Medicare, a separate supplemental, and a separate Part D.

In a perfect world (without the cons), we wouldn't have to buy any supplementals, because basic Medicare would cover it all. Private insurance industry greed-heads wouldn't be wheeling and dealing in primary healthcare at all.

JOHNCHRISTIAN's picture
JOHNCHRISTIAN 3 years 35 weeks ago
#6

Hello: So we are "Lambasting" another "New" president. I am a Dedicated Democrat and Conservative. I do not favor more Gun Control. I am getting tired of hearing only negative remarks. I voted "Green" because I would not vote for Hillary or Donald. I am sure that this Post will get a lot of idiot remarks but it's to be expected from what I have read on most of the Comments. As for his Sexual Discrepencies, look back on other presidents..... Duh. I agree with almost everything Thom Hartmann has to say but lets get out of the rut. Do you really think "Ranting" will get us anywhere? I too am very much concerned about our Social Security and Medicare. Remember, the obstacles Obama had to "Hurdle" were mostly created by past Presidents. OK............ Bring it on.

2950-10K's picture
2950-10K 3 years 35 weeks ago
#7

Remember the wall Trump said he will build?.....if you undersatnd that, then you know what he means about "insurance for everybody".

Only two more days to declare the election invalid and proceed with the treason trial. If not, and Pence becomes president, has it occurred to anyone that when the banks too big to fail go under this time around, there is no room to drop rates, and there won't be a bailout either???? House Teapublicans will block it.... No emergency economic stabilization act this time around. ...and that's just the beginning of the end, as climate change goes on anabolic steroids. Wall Street is looking at 1929 all over again.

Remember the Iraq war that should have never happened because of JEB, and Floriduh?...unlike that election fraud.....what doesn't need to happen this time around will make the Iraq war look like a simple matter.

ONLY TWO MORE DAYS TO AVIOD A GLOBAL LIVING HELL!

deepspace's picture
deepspace 3 years 35 weeks ago
#8

@ Oldskoold:

Haha ... DO IT! Wouldn't that be funny ... and so appropriate! Never happen though.

"The lady doth protest too much, methinks." Trump and Putin are sure denying the hell out of the infamous "pee pee" tapes. Alec Baldwin "splashed" it all over SNL, "pissed" off the "Donald" bigly, shook his "twitter" a little too long over all that "exposure" and media "saturation."

And yes, it is scarier than hell that these two bozos are basically in charge of two thirds of the geopolitical world. Who would have thought that China might have to play the role of adult. That's a scary thought too.

Legend 3 years 35 weeks ago
#9

So far I consider my Kaiser Permanente Advantage plan to be better than any gap plan. If you are reasonbly healthy and fit it will save you money. After 1.8 years I would have paid a lot more for a lot less with a gap plan. Kaiser is only in a few states.

Uncle Ralph's picture
Uncle Ralph 3 years 35 weeks ago
#10

One of two things will happen.

The republicans will gut the ACA and leave millions of Americans with no health insurance.

Or, they will essentially just rename the ACA to RepubliCare or, no wait, Trump will have to have his name on it: Trump-O-Care. It will be no different than it was, but it will have been distanced, at least in name, from that icky black man who twice defeated the best candidates the Republicans had to offer.

Howard Laverne Stewart's picture
Howard Laverne ... 3 years 35 weeks ago
#11

He doesn't put enough thought into what he says

Howard Laverne Stewart's picture
Howard Laverne ... 3 years 35 weeks ago
#12

He is putting more thought into Looting the US Treasury with the best Thieves in the World-Goldman Sachs

Uncle Geo's picture
Uncle Geo 3 years 35 weeks ago
#13

Tom wonders:

Does Trump actually want to go beyond Obamacare?

Is he lying?

Or was this just a clever ploy to get Republicans to keep things as they are and scrap their politically disastrous plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act?

The answers are no, of course and I doubt it, respectively. Assuming there is any cogent thought behind anything Trump says, co-opting the frame of "insurance for everybody" to describe whatever atrocity the Republicans come up with, very effectively takes the term away from us -and sows confusion. If we don't use our own frames the GOP will just take them away.

This is a perfect example of why we need to get our act together on framing.

Uncle Geo's picture
Uncle Geo 3 years 35 weeks ago
#14

John Christian brings up an important point; that "negative remarks" are not helping.

Our go-to response is to throw up facts and debunk the latest absurd statement by the GOP and their new President (and we must make them own this guy). Cognitive science and social science tell us that fact flinging and derision hurts us in a number of ways.

  1. Facts are the least effective way to communicate with voters. Like it or not, the human brain processes primarily on emotions and filters new information through existing frames -frames the GOP has masterfully spewed into people's brains for forty years.
  2. Arguing about conservative absurdities keeps us in their frames. They rail against taxes, we respond about taxes, but taxes are just something we do after we, as citizens, have already made decisions. Taxes are a result, not a cause. It's the decisions that are the issue and we should speak to those issues.
  3. The Republicans know we respond with fact flinging, so they bait us. All the time. And we fall for it. All the time.
  4. Every minute we spend debunking their carefully constructed fantasty world is a minute we are not telling people what we believe and that we care about their problems. Clinton spent her last month's ad budget exclusively on why Trump was so vile. Quick -right now- can anyone remember what she said about how she's solve the problems of rural America? I didn't think so.

Our leaders have been science deniers -they seem to have intentionally ignored cognitive science. We need a culture on the left that understands how the human brain really works and creates frames and messages that build our worldview into people's brains. This is what the GOP has done for decades and it's been so effective they can get people to believe anything.

Unlike the GOP, we can do this with integrity. Here in MN our state party is the first to fund workshops and materials on framing. We are holding them in each congressional district. We are trying to build that culture. If you're not here (or even if you are) get started by reading anything by George Lakoff and Jonathan Haidt and read Thom's books, especially Crack the Code.

If we don't do this we will be completely unprepared if the "middle" voters, in Brexit like regret, suddenly get that Trump and the GOP are morally bankrupt. If the recent polls are correct, that realization may have already started.

d.o.'s picture
d.o. 3 years 35 weeks ago
#15

Your guest who thinks health care is a privledge was loudly dominating the conversation, leaving you no space to rebut his elitist positions. I'm thinking Tea Party tactics and the kind of bullying we'll be seeing much more of in the coming months. It's not worth listening to, Thom. I think you should treat obnoxious guests the same as you do obnoxious callers.

TomDorr's picture
TomDorr 3 years 35 weeks ago
#16

There can be affordable health care for all (even taxpayers and those that like their plans and/or have "Cadillac" plans through their emplyer.)

I think the end result will be a very bare-bones plan available for they all US citizens who sign up for it with the caveat they cannot sue for malpractice except in cases of criminal negligence. Also, would only be approved for generic drugs and limited specialists.

Everyone would be able to "buy up" for more convenience and services, specialists, and to be able to sue for malpractice. This would lower costs greatly, especially if Federal Medicaid payments for insurance are given to the states (who can more easily control costs) in the form of block grants.

There will be health coverage for all afer the dust settles, I believe. Just with a much more bare bones selection of coverage for thise with subsidies, needed tort reform, and the ability for those who want more comprehensive coverage to buy up.

That would be a good thing, especially considering that the current ACA is economically unsustainable, and punishes the responsible.

Fortunately, the march to a "single payer" disaster has been not only stopped, but fortunately forced into full, disorganized retreat.

deepspace's picture
deepspace 3 years 34 weeks ago
#17

Here, let me reword what comes through loud and clear to the majority of people in this country when they hear the "final solution" proposed by fringe wing-nuts:

What they are advocating are two healthcare systems: one for the rich; one for the poor -- just like our justice system, just like our colleges. For Republicans, extreme capitalists, and other fascist types, it's always all about the money first, not the lives. Those who have it, are the privileged few who enjoy all the rights of our Constitution, proper education, proper healthcare.

The poor and uneducated are expected to fight the rich-man resource wars, and when they return home, work the physically demanding, menial service jobs that can't be off-shored to low-wage countries with lax pollution regulations. Then, hopefully, when they inevitably become a burden to the oligarchical system, they will just fade away and die. That way the luckier, the healthier, the more educated, the more wealthy will pay less taxes and have more power.

Right-wingers constantly push the meme that we are not a democracy, but rather a republic. Actually, we are neither; what our Founders suffered and died for -- a constitutionally limited, representative, democratic republic, whereby ALL power resides with the People ... ALL the people -- has been supplanted with a bastardized, militarized, corporate-controlled plutocracy ruled by the filthy few, the worst predators imaginable, which is also called a kakistocracy. Or, just call it fascism; that has less syllables for smaller minds.

If we had single-payer, Medicare for all, universal healthcare -- the same for everyone! -- and eliminated greedy insurance companies from primary (not secondary) healthcare, we could easily afford it, just like every other modern society in the world can. We could afford it even more, with plenty left over, if we also quit diverting public funds to the United States' ridiculous military empire sprawled all over planet Earth! Just the injuries alone that our soldiers sustain literally suck trillions of dollars out of our healthcare system over the course of their lives.

Perhaps, Paul Ryan's guiding saint, Ayn Rand, in her crude, poorly written fiction, "Atlas Shrugged," was right when she concluded that all the wealthy elitist assholes should just move to some island somewhere and create their "paradise" oligarchical kakistocracy, where they can pout all they want and do their own gawddamn laundry. Then they won't be sucking off the labor and the wealth of the rest of us.

Please, just go away and leave us alone. We'll manage just fine without supporting your fat asses!

Ou812's picture
Ou812 3 years 34 weeks ago
#18

Deep space:

If you want to see a two tier health plan, you need go no further than Canada. I lived in Ontario for 6 years. OHIP, The Ontario Health Insurance Plan, provides wellness care for everyone. If one has supplemental insurance through their employer, you'll be able to see any doctor. (Most Doctors won't accept new patients unless they have supplemental insurance). Those without supplemental insurance, are relegated to a clinic if you are lucky you'll see an MD, if not you'll see a PA. You'll never see the same DR twice, plus plan on spending at least a half a day waiting to be seen. It's a mess for those at the bottom.

deepspace's picture
deepspace 3 years 34 weeks ago
#19

Well then, the people of Ontario should rally to reform their system too. After all, they are supposed to be a democracy; the people are supposed to have all the power to effect the changes that work for their best interests rather than only the wealthy few.

The reason people don't have a supplemental is because they can't afford private insurance. If private insurance companies couldn't operate in the primary healthcare market, the providers, hospitals, medical equipment suppliers, pharmaceutical companies, etc. would only have to deal with just one entity, the government, in order to get paid. That would vastly simplify the system and naturally even out the costs, while still allowing them all to profit handsomely enough.

Reining in costs doesn't have to come out of the hides of healthcare professionals either. Commonly, nearly one third of their overhead are just clerical forces that only exist to fight the insurance industry clerical forces, who purposely deny more and more claims in order for their companies and shareholders to profit more and more. Such out-of-control profit-taking accounts for most of their overhead, which, in America, used to be up to forty percent of the premiums, until they were restricted to only twenty percent, which is still too much.

The government runs Medicare payouts very efficiently at only about three percent overhead, since it doesn't profit. Thus, more resources are available for paying all the legitimate claims. Plus, with Medicare-for-all, the extra tax people pay for a more stable single-payer system would be less than the premiums they now pay for private policies, which would no longer have to be paid.

In other words, why should anyone profit off sickness and death? One of the biggest drains on healthcare resources is wasted on the money changers (insurance companies and their investors) who provide no actual healthcare. Relegate them to the realm of secondary healthcare, such as elective procedures, tummy tucks, face lifts, five-star private rooms, catered meals, or whatever turns their crank. The insurance industry could still generate a profit, and their policy holders could still enjoy privileged treatment for the extra money they can afford to spend. More importantly, their added benefits would not detract from anyone else who needs primary healthcare, such as for heart attacks, cancers, diseases, broken bones, or anything that is needed to maintain health and life.

Also, higher education should be subsidized more substantially, so that more doctors, nurses, PA's, nurse practitioners, and whoever else, can be deployed to cover everyone in need. There are many, many intelligent people who would love to enter the profession but are discouraged to do so for lack of funding.

It really comes down to a false ideological battle, where pure capitalism is pitted against pure socialism, where one can only exist without the other. Our founders called it "free enterprise" and "the commons," but they understood the dynamic as complementing rather than conflicting. Some aspects of a healthy society are better owned and operated collectively, and other aspects are better owned and operated privately.

You don't want the government making TV's, cars, and shoes, for example. Neither, do you want private industry controlling public education, healthcare, police, prisons, wars, etc., or fouling the air, water, land, food, or anything else that we all equally depend on for life, liberty, and happiness.

It also comes down to what the primary purpose of government is in the first place. Does it exist to benefit all or just the few?

America became great by striving for the right balance. Of course, it was never perfect, and it never will be. However, it's the People's duty to make it a more perfect union.

What is more important than people's health? The cost is money well spent with a return many times over.

Ou812's picture
Ou812 3 years 34 weeks ago
#20

It's my opinion the job of the government is to regulate. Everything else, including payment for health care is the responsibility of the user of the service. In the case of health care, insurance companies, provide a way to defray expenses. If an individual is unhappy with the service provided by an insurance company, he or she can change to another company. With single provider, you can't. Competition is good, monopolies are bad.

Trump has told us how he and the Republicans plan to steal this election: can we stop him and save our republic?

Thom plus logo Donald Trump became president by exploiting a loophole called the Electoral College. The majority of Americans did not want him or vote for him as president, but he's there anyway.

Now he's planning on using a different loophole, the 12th Amendment, to hang onto power.
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