Welcome to TrumpCare...

After years of anticipation, Trump and the GOP have finally begun to unveil their healthcare agenda - and to paraphrase CBS' chief Les Moonves: it might not be good for America, but it sure will be good for the insurance companies!

Jonathan Cohn at the Huffington Post explains that this proposal "would change the rules for insurers that sell coverage through the Affordable Care Act's exchanges or directly to individuals".

But even more telling is the move to shorten open enrollment periods which The Hill reports is "intended to cut down on sick people gaming the system and driving up costs".

But isn't this rule just an admission that our healthcare system is designed to be difficult to access, so people are forced to "game it"?

Comments

Ron G McComb 7 years 18 weeks ago
#1

The criminal corporations have been gaming the system for their benefit for so long that to them, it's normal behavior. What are complex minds going to do if health care is as simple as asking for what you need and getting it. In a discussion of how the government is only a conduit for meeting Human need, Sartre asked Castro, "what if someone asked for the moon? Castro said it would be because they felt they needed it."

Old Kel's picture
Old Kel 7 years 18 weeks ago
#2

The term 'Health Care Laws' makes me sick. We need to speak more about 'health care rights' as a people who work hard to make this country and our families go. We do not need to fear financial ruination, wether it comes suddenly when insurance 'runs out', or at $1500 per month until death do us part.

deepspace's picture
deepspace 7 years 18 weeks ago
#3

Republican-speak translated:

"Why should the guvmut steal my money to help sick people too lazy to work? The country would be better off if they all died and quit wasting resources. Then there'd be less DemocRATS and libtards bitching and whining and voting. Meerkkka first!"

...the inner thoughts of a typical right-wing zombie without all the spin and polish to make it sound justified, moral, or intelligent.

cccccttttt 7 years 18 weeks ago
#4

Let each state run their own health care program.

Local support is important, and that is not going to come from

imposing a national system on everyone.

ct

Andrew Beckett's picture
Andrew Beckett 7 years 18 weeks ago
#5

I've read right wing comments that make your satirical one look like a proposition from Wittgenstein.

Andrew Beckett's picture
Andrew Beckett 7 years 18 weeks ago
#6

I didn't realize that life-saving and life-giving health care and a family doctor was an imposition. Single payer health care is the only way to go, and it costs half what American health care costs or perhaps less. I haven't read the latest cost outrage. Don't bother replying with the usual BS about how Canada's system is terrible and wait times blah blah blah. I've heard them all and they are all lies spewed out by insurance tycoons, and right wing traitors. What could make you proud about thousands dying from treatable illness?Why would you prefer medical bills being the leading cause of bankruptcy? What kind of person thinks it's oK for parents to have to agonize over whether to bankrupt their familites or help a sick child? I don't know what kind of brainwashing they have in your schools or what they put in your water but evidently it worked. Look at your new "leader." I hope you know the whole world is laughing at you. Please don't blow up the world to prove how righteous, Christian, and tough you are. We promise to pretend to respect you.

deepspace's picture
deepspace 7 years 18 weeks ago
#7

America, at least the oligarchic land mass between Mexico and Canada, suffers 63 million fools who have been thoroughly brainwashed into believing that the world would be a better place by unleashing a vicious pack of war-dogs and greed-masters. They voted for nothing but pure, unabashed fascism -- a growing cancer that is ravaging our Constitution, mocking our Founders, and destroying our society.

Rather than laughing or showing false respect, the rest of the free world needs to take this deadly contagion very seriously and isolate the illegitimate government of this arrogant dictator in every way possible. Don't invite him or his thugs into your countries; protest against your politicians who try to normalize relationships; cut off all his self-dealing business ties; don't buy refined fossil fuels from his oil tycoons; don't renew contracts with his "defense" contractors; ridicule and shun his every authoritarian word and deed.

The violent, fascist ideology of these radical, white-supremacist, Christian terrorists needs to be quarantined before it spreads to other, still-functioning democracies.

Kend's picture
Kend 7 years 17 weeks ago
#8

Ccctttt is right. It should be done state by state like Canada. Every state has different needs. By the way Andrew in some provinces in Canada there can be very long waits for none life threatening surgeries like knee, shoulder, hip etc. Up to a year. My neighbor just went to a private clinic fo knee surgery than cost him $7,500 rather then wait 7 months. Most Canadians also have private insurance here for all the things that are not covered by our provincial health care. Like meds, eye, teeth, therapy ambulance, etc. That costs me about $200 A month per employee. Also keep in mind Canada has 1/10 of the population of the US, about 36 million and we have ten times the resources the US has and here the government owns all mineral rights that help subsidize the healthcare costs. from my time in the US I can clearly see two things that would reduce costs immediately my eye drop is $16.00 in Canada, before my plan that covers 90%, and at the same Safeway pharmacy same mfg $125.00 in Scottsdale AZ that is just wrong and you have to stop these f ing law suits for medical stuff it is unbelievable how my commercials for lawyers there is on tv. I have never known of any lawsuit of any kind for healthcare up here. They all do their best and they are human they make mistakes, not having to pour out insurance coasts would reduce costs instantly.

leighmf's picture
leighmf 7 years 17 weeks ago
#9

It should be more commonly known that Big Insurance owns the stock of B. Pharm, the mortgages and leases of Medical Facilities, Medical Equipment Manufacturers, and most insidious of all, Medical Supply Companies. Medical Supply Companies are the greatest bilkers of Medicare and insurance claims. They over-supply and over-bill. They sell the stuff of Lab Tests. Big Insurance also owns the stock of B. Banks. Though banks are not allowed to invest in corporations, B. Insurance can invest in both and create mutual pools through Trust Companies when their mergers are blocked, such as the recent blocking of the AETNA/HUMANA merger. B. Insurance never loses, but it constantly threatens our lives with the need for disaster protection. T'ink about it....

Legend 7 years 17 weeks ago
#10

We had amendment 69 in Colorado for single payer. The insurance companies dumped millions into advertising against it.

k. allen's picture
k. allen 7 years 17 weeks ago
#11

(leighmf - #9)
"... B. Insurance never loses, but it constantly threatens our lives with the need for disaster protection. T'ink about it...."

Isn't that what insurance is all about - like, if you pay up, you are somehow protected from disaster/damages ... if not, well, ..., not.

So. People do what they must ..., or not.

The good news for me is that life flows through the vital core one breath at a time - cleansing, nourishing and renewing every cell with every breath ... the root of health, and the greatest gift of life is this dynamic phenomenon: the breath of life.

I came to this realization at a time when medical procedures to 'save my life' (unavailable to me at the time) might easily have distracted my awareness from that threshold of receiving the breath, and letting it go ... one breath at a time ... not knowing whether it will return.

At this moment, I know without question, that life is a gift ... a blessing (however mixed) ... not to be owned or controlled - bought or sold ... only, to be accepted, embraced, and let go ... as it comes and goes, of its own accord ....

All else is peripheral.

All these stressful arguments about 'health care', and who owns what, or has to pay for what - or not ... how does this serve good health?

If, in the long run, the same exclusive interests wind up as the ownership class - why not accept that for what it is, and (like water) find other ways to flow?

2950-10K's picture
2950-10K 7 years 17 weeks ago
#12

First of all it's health insurance that needs to be reformed, not healthcare. The insurance companies are the ones that want it called healthcare reform...that distracts attention away from their massive fraud.

Why aren't the Dems in the House and Senate screaming out single payer? .....don't they need votes in 2018 or something?.... hello! Geeez I forgot, that would be going on offense. ....rarely a democratic strategy. That would be just rude.

Polls clearly indicate single payer is by far the will of the vast majority. Instead we now have governance by and for only the billionaires, which is plain old textbook fascism. Well guess what...we the people can't afford this welfare program for the rich any longer. Education and healthcare both need to be a cradle to grave right, and not for profit. Energy needs to be nationalized...Don't worry, the Koch's won't end up on food stamps. In fact nationalization of energy will be the only shot we have to slow down climate change.

None of this will happen by simply being well spoken and polite.

2950-10K's picture
2950-10K 7 years 17 weeks ago
#13

Hey, I hear Trump's birth certificate is a fake....they say he was really born in Russia! That sounds pretty stupid doesn't it....well all you righties, your current election fraud president said that same dumb ass thing about the last president, and your president was serious when he said it. That same crazy man now has access to the nuclear codes ....just saying.

k. allen's picture
k. allen 7 years 17 weeks ago
#14

(2950-10K - #12)


"First of all it's health insurance that needs to be reformed, not healthcare. The insurance companies are the ones that want it called healthcare reform...that distracts attention away from their massive fraud."

Thank you for clarifying that point. This dog eat dog insurance marketplace has American health care by the throat. Wee peeps are the little drops of blood left behind for scavengers to scarf up from the ground. I do not see how health is served in this environment.


Why aren't the Dems in the House and Senate screaming out single payer? .....don't they need votes in 2018 or something?.... hello! Geeez I forgot, that would be going on offense. ....rarely a democratic strategy. That would be just rude.

It's gone way beyond rude. It's downright dangerous - besides, a lot of those folks are personally compromised - on all sides - at least, it seems that way to me.


Polls clearly indicate single payer is by far the will of the vast majority. Instead we now have governance by and for only the billionaires, which is plain old textbook fascism. Well guess what...we the people can't afford this welfare program for the rich any longer.

I hear that.


Education and healthcare both need to be a cradle to grave right, and not for profit. Energy needs to be nationalized...Don't worry, the Koch's won't end up on food stamps. In fact nationalization of energy will be the only shot we have to slow down climate change.

I have no objection to any of that, if well and fairly administered.

It's just many times removed from imminent questions of daily survival that so many people are facing - not unrelated, but not the first priority when food and shelter are not easily obtained.


None of this will happen by simply being well spoken and polite."

Ok, I think being well spoken and polite has great value, especially when communicating with people who do not hear, or respond positively to anything else. My experience tells me, it's truth that turns the wheel. Unless I am swallowed by hypocrisy, I will speak the truth in whatever way communicates most effectively ... this, from someone who tends to speak and behave like a wrecking ball.

I kind of like the reception I get when people listen, and try to hear what I am saying. I also like how I feel when I do the same to others. I'm ok with polite behavior, so long as I don't have to lie.

I know it's life or death in too many places. Whose face do I scream in to change that?

And yes, this is an extremely dangerous moment in human culture.
I hear the calls to resist and oppose ... in so many ways, this seems counterintuitive ... but it's over my head, so, I figure every one of us has our own basket to weave ... I do what I can, one breath at a time - and hope it makes a difference, somehow.

I trust you, and other people, to do the same in your own spheres of influence ... and hope we can work this complex puzzle between us.

Hephaestus's picture
Hephaestus 7 years 17 weeks ago
#15

#11... you are so right!

Lots of folk have forgotten

Running on ego!

Hephaestus's picture
Hephaestus 7 years 17 weeks ago
#16

Sorry!

America and its approach to the health of its citizens is no better than that found in countries where people die because they can not find IDR 5.000.000 to treat a person after going around many members of the family to help

Utter inhumanity that aught to create shame within the heart and upon people that occupy an economic leader on this planet

Abominable!

k. allen's picture
k. allen 7 years 17 weeks ago
#17

Thank you, Hephaestus. For years, I couldn't afford to see a doctor, let alone buy insurance. I am lucky to live in a city where people support community health clinics and you don't have to drive a smooth ride just to get through the door ... at least, for a while there ... we'll see where it goes from here ....

Robindell's picture
Robindell 7 years 17 weeks ago
#18

Switzerland has a higher life expectancy than does America. There is universal health care coverage in Switzerland, but the country does not have a single payer system. Non-profit health plans are sold by private companies. The government makes sure that the cost of the plans are affordable based on household income. The coverage is no doubt very extensive. In Europe, prescription drug costs are usually much more reasonable than in the U.S., and then on top of better pricing, countries have excellent health plans that cover most of the cost of drugs, so that citizens pay low fees to buy prescription drugs. Single payer is only one form of universal health care. Germany also does not have a single payer system. Great Britain has a national health care system which is directly supported by taxes, and not pased on paying indivivdual claims. It is like going to a Veteran's Affairs clinic or hospital in this country.

When people on this Web site write about the Democratic Party, they often have no nuance whatsoever. Some Democrats are and always have been very progressive on health care. They would have supported either a single payer system or tightly regulated non-profit health plans from private entities, such as exists in countries like Switzerland or Germany. Other Democrats were and are too skeptical and politically frightened to openly support a remake of health coverage through either a Canadian or Swiss approach. Many potential Demcratic voters never vote in Congressional elections, and many do not even vote for president. Poor education, alienation, whatever the cause, the Democrats have not been able to established a mechanism for trying to contact and reach a huge number of apathetic voters. Even though progressives cite polls where public opinion supports some univeral approach to health coverage, such as single payer, and cite Hillary having won the popular vote, these do not translate into a Democratic majority. Gerrymandering relates to the situation in the U.S. House. People have come to believe that government can't get things done, and there is some evidence for that. That tends to increase rather than decrease skepticism toward finding new and better policies and programs. Also, Americans have become judgmental rather than accepting of their fellow citizens, on the downward economic side. If you are doing well, you are good; if not, you are not so good, andmight be no good. People on the left remind me of Trump in one respect: they both have complained rather bitterly about the news media. Where did this get anyone? The overall socialization process has become distorted, many reject education as being a good thing, even among some supposedly educated people, and their opinion may be somewhat justified because of the ineffective nature of much of education, in civics, history, sociology, basic economic statistics, science, the arts, and in decency in respecting others on some basic level. International business is a fact of life for many companies. The situation ethnically and in terms of world view is complex. There is fear and prejudice, but there is also the necessity of acceptance and cooperation.

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