Recent comments

  • SCOTUS Has Gone Rogue   1 day 16 hours ago

    In conclusion, it would seem that the MTA folks have not through the unintended consequences. "Corporations are not people" may make for a good bumper sticker to appeal to low information voters but good policy it is not.

  • The Tea Party Nation Opposes Free Trade is Not Conservative   1 day 16 hours ago

    Good post, Mark. I've kinda given up on trade related posts because they usually go nowhere. As opposed to threads on social issues, which usually explode with activity. I must plead guilty of participating in one or two of these lately.

    No wonder the economic pirates continue to present divisive social issues to split and distract everyone. It works.

    The other thing is I believe most modern liberals don't really care much about trade anyway. The rise of the tech industry - and its dependence on "greed is good" business practices such as offshoring, stock option fraud, tax evasion, massive executive salaries – born in the traditional hotbed of liberalism, the Left Coast, have pretty much forced elimination of concerns about these matters from the left. So Left Coast lawmakers, who must bow to these mammoths, are usually corporate Dems. So there went out the window, some of the best opportunities we had to have true economically progressive lawmakers, especially in the Senate. If all we get are Corporate Dems from CA we are in trouble. So we’re left with the “social issue” left, which although important, looks the other way and checks their Chinese made Iphone made by slave labor, as their issues continue to achieve success, while concerns of the economic left gets flushed down the toilet with the used TP.

    It’s my experience that many, many conservatives are as keenly aware of bad trade policy as liberals. Consider Lou Dobbs, Pat Buchanan, etc. etc., who are extremely vocal about trade. Lindsey Graham of all people, has supported or co-sponsored failed bills to get us out of the WTO. Actually I find Buchanan one of the most forceful and articulate pundits on trade. Some of Thom’s guests on the subject of trade, Eamon Fingleton, and Tom Paulken, are conservatives if I am not mistaken.

    I posted on Ron Paul's website for awhile, and it was about 50/50, pro- and anti- free trade which is about what I see on the left. More than 50% on the left will give it lip service of course, but if you look at the focus, it's clear that labor/trade is way down on the left's agenda. At least the right is more honest about it. However most are ignorant of the giveaway of U.S. trade policy. However, I'd suspect that if given the choice of cheap gadgets and tariffs, most would choose cheap gadgets - left and right. That's why we are where we are.

  • Would Pro Choice Arguments Be The Same If...   1 day 16 hours ago
    Quote MarinaL:

    ZZ

    I am aware of some very fine prose in the US constitution but I have not found it too easy to equate that with the reality.

    We do things differently and that is what we choose. A Wiki insert is hardly likely to sway me in your direction.

    I wouldn't expect one visit to Wikipedia or the ACLU's website to sway you. I honestly don't mean to patronize you, because I see you're an educated woman already, but truth is, education in American liberty takes time and study, especially if you're wedded to the idea that democracy means "the majority rules."

    I respectfully suggest you camp out at the ACLU's website for a long semester of reading. You might be surprised to discover all the successes on behalf of human liberty we've seen during the short history of our nation.

  • Would Pro Choice Arguments Be The Same If...   1 day 16 hours ago

    ZZ

    I am aware of some very fine prose in the US constitution but I have not found it too easy to equate that with the reality.

    We do things differently and that is what we choose. A Wiki insert is hardly likely to sway me in your direction.

    I do understand that you believe that what you do is the only way and seem to do so sincerely. Again, it is NOT our way. Can we not just understand and accept those differences?

    Actually, Russia was the first country to install true democracy until it was swept away by the Mongul invasion. In fact, my direct ancestor was the one to do it. It was about a 1000 years ago though!

    regards

    Alyona

  • Tea Bag Utopia Crashing In Kansas   1 day 16 hours ago
    Quote drc2:

    al3, you are correct, except for the whole urbanization "enclosure." Check out .ren's history of being forced off the sustainable farm by "money." We may have to rediscover the country and bring urban culture out of these clusters and "ghettos."

    Not sure what you mean here, drc2.

    Quote drc2:While you are correct on the who pays for whom, the reasons change the moral equations, and I would rather leave the answers open so we can invite our friends from Kansas to the conversation.
    Fair enough, just avoid the subject of God, guns, gays, abortion, and agree that the urban blacks are the real "moochers," not those "small gubmint real Americans" out in tumbleweed-land. In your conversation, good luck tiptoeing around the inevitable "Let me tell you something I know about the Negro.." that will eventually come up.....

    As long as you can avoid these booby traps planted by Fox, et. al., a focused conversation about the economic pirates may be possible.

  • Would Pro Choice Arguments Be The Same If...   1 day 16 hours ago
    Quote Alberto Ceras 2:
    Quote Zenzoe:

    I am going to call you on that one, Alberto: Liar! You seem to have forgotten that you and I exchanged several emails way back when, where you mentioned your son who lives in the U.S. Perhaps those particular "grandchildren" were "adopted," but you, yourself, have reproduced, you "selfish, stupid, ignorant, careless, thoughtless," person, you. Oye!

    Hello? What's the matter with you, Alberto? Oh, yeah— "do as I say, not as I do..." Ha!

    No, he isn't my biological son. No matter, he is my son and we like it that way. We, too, have adopted each other. The word "adopt" has, I suspect, several meanings, fer instance, "my adopted country."

    So you lied, originally, in representing that person as your "son" to me. Seems to me you'd say, "my 'adoptive' son," if you were going to be honest. Regardless, who cares, one way or the other, whether you have biological children, other than the hypocrisy of your claims?

    In any case, your attitude toward those of us who have children is bigoted, unkind and nasty— and that's the important thing here.

    Why you think a movement is needed to end the human population explosion is beyond me. Surely you've noticed that nature will take care of that soon enough. A natural, human extinction is on its way. Who needs a movement, when we're busy making life uninhabitable for ourselves as it is?

  • Would Pro Choice Arguments Be The Same If...   1 day 16 hours ago
    Quote MarinaL:

    ... At present, 53% of the Russian population is against further gay rights. As I see it, that is a democratic majority...

    Others here have adroitly responded to this opinion of yours, but I'm not getting the impression that you understand yet why we take exception to your making the issue one of "majority rule."

    In brief, FYI, in America, liberty for all is the principle we should live by, not "majority rule."

    Democracy means that people ought to be able to vote for public officials in fair elections, and make most political decisions by majority rule. Liberty, on the other hand, means that even in a democracy, individuals have rights that no majority should be able to take away.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyranny_of_the_majority

    It's a thing called freedom for all, Alyona.

    We've had a long and bloody struggle trying to include everyone in the promise of the Bill of Rights and the Constitution. We've slipped up many times on that score, and right now we're still struggling to limit the tyranny both of the majority, where the majority would deny liberty based on bigotry, and where the government would deny liberty based on "national security" and/or other unwise, unfair and unjust reasons.

    Perhaps you're not so familiar with this distinction, since Russia hasn't known the kind of democracy America represents by its Constitution and Bill of Rights, if not in fact.

  • Would Pro Choice Arguments Be The Same If...   1 day 17 hours ago
    Quote Zenzoe:

    I am going to call you on that one, Alberto: Liar! You seem to have forgotten that you and I exchanged several emails way back when, where you mentioned your son who lives in the U.S. Perhaps those particular "grandchildren" were "adopted," but you, yourself, have reproduced, you "selfish, stupid, ignorant, careless, thoughtless," person, you. Oye!

    Hello? What's the matter with you, Alberto? Oh, yeah— "do as I say, not as I do..." Ha!

    No, he isn't my biological son. No matter, he is my son and we like it that way. We, too, have adopted each other. The word "adopt" has, I suspect, several meanings, fer instance, "my adopted country."

  • Robert Kenner's Merchants of Doubt   1 day 17 hours ago

    I'm working on something. Craig Chalquist in his presentation on Conscious Apocalypse: Outliving our Ruling Institutions touches on it when he says we are in the an archetypal time of apocalypse.

    Writers can be occasionally singularly visionary, as Hedges often is, but we also pull from each other to draw our visions. It's a community effort, and sometimes it is difficult because of that to find the source for the stimulation of our own visions. Sometimes we mistake the group vision for our own, and, yes it is, but it isn't, thus it can be deeper than that by being both and more. To see into the depths the opaque screen of the individual ego must be purged.

    I, for instance, began to see how institutions rule and I directly experienced the existential ways that people succumb without seriously questioning what they are bowing and bending to when I was in the military. Boot Camp was like going into a Soviet Gulag to me. When I found myself in the Vietnam theater, which involved other ports of call, like Subic Bay, Hong Kong, Yokosuka, Singapore and Sydney, I watched how humans could become machines. This may not be such a stark vision if one has not directly experienced nature, lived with animals and plants, and experienced the kind of empathetic communication that goes on between a human being and the animals we can then learn to know intimately, and live with in direct clarity, as I did on our family farm.

    While going into the Navy, which was a choice resulting from of the threat of an Army draft notice in the mail combined with a recent closed casket funeral for a next door neighbor who'd gone down in a helicopter on his first mission in Vietnam, I did not have access to the larger political spectrum that put me there. All I knew was that my visions of traveling to Paris and hanging out with writers like Camus and Sartre in cafes was being interrupted through forces well beyond my immediate control. But I could already see that there was a point between my individual experienced spectrum, and something abstract I called the United States and its military institution where I was making choices, choices others were assuming they did not have. And that realization created a deep, seering tension throughout my very being that drove me, obsessively, to question.

    Thus, I began to explore this whole notion of institutional rule, without really having a road map or a plan. I needed the help of others who've attempted to map it out to find my way. Jacques Ellul, whose deeply insightful book on The Technological Society (I still have my $2.95 copy I bought back in 1971) was a seminal reading experience for me after I got out of the Navy and decided I needed some experience in college before I could finally join those writers in Paris. So I named one of my dogs Jacques years later in appreciation of Ellul's shared insight, because it took me years, and the consuming integration of many other insights, to appreciate just how powerful those insights were. And when I stumbled across a title in one of my searches that included the phrase "Outliving our Ruling Institutions" I jumped on it, and was rewarded with a very insightful talk, dipping into literature and mythology, long favorite areas of exploration, about living collectively in an archetype of apocalypse.

    In reference to your final paragraph:

    Quote NMHiker:

    This is what all-indigenous communities tell us over and over again. But it always falls on deaf ears of those who still cling to their illusions and corporate gravy train to keep the cute little house on Sunny Side Street in the burbs equiped with all the modern toys and one's SUV humming along: those metal coffins that move all the sheep along in unity and conformity to their own death kneel. The aliveness and authenticity long ago crushed the spirit into The Automoton that is churned out like Jimmie Dean susages.

    You in particular may appreciate some of Ellul's insights in this 54 minute interview/portrayal just before his death:

    Jaques Ellul -- The Betrayal by Technology Full French w/ English Subtitles

    Especially the one about everyone individually and "independently" getting in their vehicles and driving en masse to the beach for a week end holiday.

    Ellul, by the way, was a French Theologian/sociologist and an anarchist, which I think would touch on and integrate with your own interests and pursuits.

    I now believe people have to be driven from within to search for themselves. I don't believe inspiration can be preached into them. I am still clueless as to why some are driven to search and most seemingly aren't, but rather will take what's given and be satisfied, even try to beat anyone to a pulp for raising questions.

    I think someone like Chris Hedges can successfully share his own driven questioning and searching, and I imagine he is now coming into his own as an ordained minister (he was recently finally ordained on October 5) after years of practicing what his father told him, after his Presbyterian Church rejected his "call." "You," his father said, "are ordained to write."

  • Would Pro Choice Arguments Be The Same If...   1 day 17 hours ago
    Quote drbjmn:
    Quote Zenzoe:

    Sheesh, Drbjmn, I apologize, and you're still mad at me?

    Where did I address you with "the likes of you?" It sounds a little bit like me, but usually I'll say "the likes of so-and-so," not "the likes of you." Show me, okay?

    Rape culture post #776

    "I don't see you asking Drc2 to be "a little less aggressive" with Vhok. So, do me a favor and go try tell some other female not to behave too "aggressively." I'm the agent of myself and don't appreciate being patronized by the likes of you."

    What are the likes of me, exactly?

    I see... you're right. I did write that. Better would have been "...don't appreciate being patronized by YOU." "The likes of" was redundant, no doubt. ;-)

    So I see you don't want to be a friend where spats don't turn into life-long grudges? You prefer the grudges. Well, I can play that game too— how about, Why should I be a friend to a man who tells women to "shut up," "shut it," and "shush it," every other minute? Come to think of it, I shouldn't!

    But, of course, peace, love, and don't forget, "have a nice day!"

    :-D

  • Would Pro Choice Arguments Be The Same If...   1 day 17 hours ago
    Quote rs allen:

    "........and a well trained husband" unquote

    That must be just an unfortunate use of words. Either that or you're planning on coupling with a trained dog or horse. Whatever, but trained doesn't imply any equality at all.

    Contrary to popular belief in the USA, Russians DO have a sense of humour. He will however be carefully chosen as 'good breeding stock' LOL

  • F*** The EU - Neocons And The Neonazi Ukrainian Coup   1 day 17 hours ago

    From Robert Parry:

    (CONSORIUM NEWS) The Neocons — Masters of Chaos
    October 17, 2014

    Exclusive: America’s neoconservatives, by stirring up trouble in the Middle East and Eastern Europe, are creating risks for the world’s economy that are surfacing now in the turbulent stock markets, threatening another global recession, writes Robert Parry.

    By Robert Parry

    If you’re nervously watching the stock market gyrations and worrying about your declining portfolio or pension fund, part of the blame should go to America’s neocons who continue to be masters of chaos, endangering the world’s economy by instigating geopolitical confrontations in the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

    Of course, there are other factors pushing Europe’s economy to the brink of a triple-dip recession and threatening to stop America’s fragile recovery, too. But the neocons’ “regime change” strategies, which have unleashed violence and confrontations across Iraq, Syria, Libya, Iran and most recently Ukraine, have added to the economic uncertainty.
    Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs Victoria Nuland during a press conference at the U.S. Embassy in Kiev, Ukraine, on Feb. 7, 2014. (U.S. State Department photo)

    Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs Victoria Nuland during a press conference at the U.S. Embassy in Kiev, Ukraine, on Feb. 7, 2014. (U.S. State Department photo)

    This neocon destabilization of the world economy began with the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 under President George W. Bush who squandered some $1 trillion on the bloody folly. But the neocons’ strategies have continued through their still-pervasive influence in Official Washington during President Barack Obama’s administration.

    The neocons and their “liberal interventionist” junior partners have kept the “regime change” pot boiling with the Western-orchestrated overthrow and killing of Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi in 2011, the proxy civil war in Syria to oust Bashar al-Assad, the costly economic embargoes against Iran, and the U.S.-backed coup that ousted Ukraine’s elected President Viktor Yanukovych last February.

    All these targeted governments were first ostracized by the neocons and the major U.S. news organizations, such as the Washington Post and the New York Times, which have become what amounts to neocon mouthpieces. Whenever the neocons decide that it’s time for another “regime change,” the mainstream U.S. media enlists in the propaganda wars.

    The consequence of this cascading disorder has been damaging and cumulative. The costs of the Iraq War strapped the U.S. Treasury and left less government maneuvering room when Wall Street crashed in 2008. If Bush still had the surplus that he inherited from President Bill Clinton – rather than a yawning deficit – there might have been enough public money to stimulate a much-faster recovery.

    President Obama also wouldn’t have been left to cope with the living hell that the U.S. occupation brought to the people of Iraq, violent chaos that gave birth to what was then called “Al-Qaeda in Iraq” and has since rebranded itself “the Islamic State.”

    But Obama didn’t do himself (or the world) any favors when he put much of his foreign policy in the hands of Democratic neocon-lites, such as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and Bush holdovers, including Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Gen. David Petraeus. At State, Clinton promoted the likes of neocon Victoria Nuland, the wife of arch-neocon Robert Kagan, and Obama brought in “liberal interventionists” like Samantha Power, now the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.

    In recent years, the neocons and “liberal interventionists” have become almost indistinguishable, so much so that Robert Kagan has opted to discard the discredited neocon label and call himself a “liberal interventionist.” [See Consortiumnews.com’s “Obama’s True Foreign Policy ‘Weakness.’”]

    Manipulating Obama

    Obama, in his nearly six years as president, also has shied away from imposing his more “realistic” views about world affairs on the neocon/liberal-interventionist ideologues inside the U.S. pundit class and his own administration. He has been outmaneuvered by clever insiders (as happened in 2009 on the Afghan “surge”) or overwhelmed by some Official Washington “group think” (as was the case in Libya, Syria, Iran and Ukraine).

    Once all the “smart people” reach some collective decision that a foreign leader “must go,” Obama usually joins the chorus and has shown only rare moments of toughness in standing up to misguided conventional wisdoms.

    The one notable case was his decision in summer 2013 to resist pressure to destroy Syria’s military after a Sarin gas attack outside Damascus sparked a dubious rush to judgment blaming Assad’s regime. Since then, more evidence has pointed to a provocation by anti-Assad extremists who may have thought that the incident would draw in the U.S. military on their side. [See Consortiumnews.com’s “Was Turkey Behind Syrian Sarin Attack?”]

    It’s now clear that if Obama had ordered a major bombing campaign against Assad’s military in early September 2013, he might have opened the gates of Damascus to a hellish victory by al-Qaeda-affiliated extremists or the even more brutal Islamic State, since these terrorist groups have emerged as the only effective fighters against Assad.

    But the neocons and the “liberal interventionists” seemed oblivious to that danger. They had their hearts set on Syrian “regime change,” so were furious when their dreams were dashed by Obama’s supposed “weakness,” i.e. his failure to do what they wanted. They also blamed Russian President Vladimir Putin who brokered a compromise with Assad in which he agreed to surrender all of Syria’s chemical weapons while still denying a role in the Sarin attack.

    By late September 2013, the disappointed neocons were acting out their anger by taking aim at Putin. They recognized that a particular vulnerability for the Russian president was Ukraine and the possibility that it could be pulled out of Russia’s sphere of influence and into the West’s orbit.

    So, Carl Gershman, the neocon president of the U.S.-funded National Endowment for Democracy, took to the op-ed page of the neocon-flagship Washington Post to sound the trumpet about Ukraine, which he called “the biggest prize.”

    But Gershman added that Ukraine was really only an interim step to an even bigger prize, the removal of the strong-willed and independent-minded Putin, who, Gershman added, “may find himself on the losing end not just in the near abroad [i.e. Ukraine] but within Russia itself.” In other words, the new neocon hope was for “regime change” in Kiev and Moscow. [See Consortiumnews.com’s “Neocons’ Ukraine/Syria/Iran Gambit.”]

    Destabilizing the World

    Beyond the recklessness of plotting to destabilize nuclear-armed Russia, the neocon strategy threatened to shake Europe’s fragile economic recovery from a painful recession, six years of jobless stress that had strained the cohesion of the European Union and the euro zone.

    Across the Continent, populist parties from the Right and Left have been challenging establishment politicians over their inability to reverse the widespread unemployment and the growing poverty. Important to Europe’s economy was its relationship with Russia, a major market for agriculture and manufactured goods and a key source of natural gas to keep Europe’s industries humming and its houses warm.

    The last thing Europe needed was more chaos, but that’s what the neocons do best and they were determined to punish Putin for disrupting their plans for Syrian “regime change,” an item long near the top of their agenda along with their desire to “bomb, bomb, bomb Iran.”

    Putin also had sidetracked that possible war with Iran by helping to forge an interim agreement constraining but not eliminating Iran’s nuclear program. So, he became the latest target of neocon demonization, a process in which the New York Times and the Washington Post eagerly took the lead.

    To get at Putin, however, the first step was Ukraine where Gershman’s NED was funding scores of programs for political activists and media operatives. These efforts fed into mass protests against Ukrainian President Yanukovych for balking at an EU association agreement that included a harsh austerity plan designed by the International Monetary Fund. Yanukovych opted instead for a more generous $15 billion loan deal from Putin.

    As the political violence in Kiev escalated – with the uprising’s muscle supplied by neo-Nazi militias from western Ukraine – neocons within the Obama administration discussed how to “midwife” a coup against Yanukovych. Central to this planning was Victoria Nuland, who had been promoted to assistant secretary of state for European affairs and was urging on the protesters, even passing out cookies to protesters at Kiev’s Maidan square.

    According to an intercepted phone call with U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Geoffrey Pyatt, Nuland didn’t think EU officials were being aggressive enough. “Fuck the EU,” she said as she brainstormed how “to help glue this thing.” She literally handpicked who should be in the post-coup government – “Yats is the guy,” a reference to Arseniy Yatsenyuk who would indeed become prime minister.

    When the coup went down on Feb. 22 – spearheaded by neo-Nazi militias who seized government buildings and forced Yanukovych and his officials to flee for their lives – the U.S. State Department quickly deemed the new regime “legitimate” and the mainstream U.S. media dutifully stepped up the demonization of Yanukovych and Putin.

    Although Putin’s position had been in support of Ukraine’s status quo – i.e., retaining the elected president and the country’s constitutional process – the crisis was pitched to the American people as a case of “Russian aggression” with dire comparisons made between Putin and Hitler, especially after ethnic Russians in the east and south resisted the coup regime in Kiev and Crimea seceded to rejoin Russia.

    Starting a Trade War

    Pressured by the Obama administration, the EU agreed to sanction Russia for its “aggression,” touching off a tit-for-tat trade war with Moscow which reduced Europe’s sale of farming and manufacturing goods to Russia and threatened to disrupt Russia’s natural gas supplies to Europe.

    While the most serious consequences were to Ukraine’s economy which went into freefall because of the civil war, some of Europe’s most endangered economies in the south also were hit hard by the lost trade with Russia. Europe began to stagger toward the third dip in a triple-dip recession with European markets experiencing major stock sell-offs.

    The dominoes soon toppled across the Atlantic as major U.S. stock indices dropped, creating anguish among many Americans just when it seemed the hangover from Bush’s 2008 market crash was finally wearing off.

    Obviously, there are other reasons for the recent stock market declines, including fears about the Islamic State’s victories in Syria and Iraq, continued chaos in Libya, and exclusion of Iran from the global economic system – all partly the result of neocon ideology. There have been unrelated troubles, too, such as the Ebola epidemic in western Africa and various weather disasters.

    But the world’s economy usually can withstand some natural and manmade challenges. The real problem comes when a combination of catastrophes pushes the international financial system to a tipping point. Then, even a single event can dump the world into economic chaos, like what happened when Lehman Brothers collapsed in 2008.

    It’s not clear whether the world is at such a tipping point today, but the stock market volatility suggests that we may be on the verge of another worldwide recession. Meanwhile, the neocon masters of chaos seem determined to keep putting their ideological obsessions ahead of the risks to Americans and people everywhere.

  • Recommendations needed for financial news sources   1 day 17 hours ago

    Like any news you should get it from a wide variety of sources, not place yourself in a like minded bubble.

  • Would Pro Choice Arguments Be The Same If...   1 day 17 hours ago
    Quote Alberto Ceras 2:
    Quote Aliceinwonderland:

    Reply to #152 (again!)- "Alberto" sermonizes: “Anyone who engenders a child is either selfish, stupid, ignorant, careless, thoughtless or a combination of these epithets.”

    Gee whiz, that sure is interesting, since Mister C happens to be a grandfather (ahem-ahem-tsk-tsk). Last I heard, "Alberto", you had to have children before you could be a grandparent. HaHaHaHaHaHaHaHa! - AIW

    P.S. Ho-Ho-Ho-Ho-Ho!

    They are not my biological children. They have adopted me, and I them.

    I am going to call you on that one, Alberto: Liar! You seem to have forgotten that you and I exchanged several emails way back when, where you mentioned your son who lives in the U.S. Perhaps those particular "grandchildren" were "adopted," but you, yourself, have reproduced, you "selfish, stupid, ignorant, careless, thoughtless," person, you. Oye!

    Hello? What's the matter with you, Alberto? Oh, yeah— "do as I say, not as I do..." Ha!

  • We Need An Ebola Travel Ban Now   1 day 17 hours ago

    To say we should not take any step to prevent people from infected areas from coming here because there are ways around it is a bit silly.

    It is also silly to say stopping commercial airlines would prevent aid from getting to the areas that need help. Such aid should be organized and properly trained and could be flown in noncommercial aircraft.

  • Would Pro Choice Arguments Be The Same If...   1 day 17 hours ago

    "........and a well trained husband" unquote

    That must be just an unfortunate use of words. Either that or you're planning on coupling with a trained dog or horse. Whatever, but trained doesn't imply any equality at all.

  • Would Pro Choice Arguments Be The Same If...   1 day 17 hours ago

    Alberto, Alberto

    Now I see it. Russians should not reproduce as we are sub-human and on top of that, we do not want any more coloured people being born. Is that it?

    You will get nothing but stupid answers from me on this subject as your whole cause is not germane here in Russia.

    Lets look at this just one more time.

    US population 320 million and Russia about 145 million.

    USA 9.62 million km2

    Russian Federation 17.075 million km2

    No wonder our ICBMs have to be so evolved. You are rather a small target! LOL

    Give it a break my friend. Esta conversación se está convirtiendo en una tontería.

    best

    Alyona

  • End. Fracking. Now!   1 day 18 hours ago

    Here in Canada we have been fracking for for over 70 years. Not once has there ever been ANY water contaminated. I makes me wonder how they do it there. Either they are doing it wrong or someone is lying about the the leaks. From what I understand water is less then 100 feet below surface and most oil and gas is over a 1000 ft deep. How the frack does it happen.

    If you notice Thom said "contaminated water MAY have". So they are shutting down 11 wells because "MAY HAVE" nice to see they are taking no chances but the truth is the problem probaly isn't from fracking. I think it is dangerous to keep crying wolf. I am starting to be a non believer myself. After all Al Gore told me the ocean would be two inches higher by now. New York is supposed to be under water. The fact is nothing has changed. We have spent billions on all of this and CO2 levels have not dropped at all. I wonder if all that money was spent on healthcare how many more people would be alive today.

  • Would Pro Choice Arguments Be The Same If...   1 day 18 hours ago
    Quote drc2:

    I disagree with the "right" of a culture to discriminate on the basis of race or religion when it comes to human rights. "Democracy" does not include setting arbitrary limits on who gets to be part of a society and who gets crapped on. GLBT discrimination is irrational and has been disproved to have any basis in nature or social reality over and over. While I appreciate that this is news to a lot of religious people and that homophobia has not been treated with the same pathological diagnosis we can find in, misogyny and men who want to limit your sovereignty over your womb. That is not subject to cultural relativity, I guess.

    I'm just saying that it is the same with GLBT, and that you have no right to keep these people from equal protection under the law, etc. Prejudice is not enough.

    The standards you set for your daughter are yours, and my experience with this age group is that repression increases the sexualization of pre-maritalness. Young women who are confident of themselves in general, can make good moral choices because they are not desperate or so curious they just have to find out. Education helps with that as well.

    What I would like to have you appreciate is that your standards are not God's. Your opinions on what should be allowed for others become the evangelicalism you decry in others. The only thing I have ever said about "your" or other women's wombs is that they belong to you. If that is bleating, I give up.

    erm.... democracy is about the majority making decisions and not about upholding the bleatings of some preacher on the other side of the world (thank God) spouting his personal take on rights.

    By trying to inflict the views of the West on another culture, the first thing we do is to take a careful look at that culture and ask ourselves 'Is this what we want here?' Seems to be a resounding no right now.

    Indeed, by preaching in such ways, all you succeed in doing is to confirm Newton's Laws.

    Thank you also so much for your most informative 'primer on child raising for sub human potato growers'. I shall cherish your advice until I have the blessing of having my own children. I am very glad to hear that young women in the USA are so very responsible and do not have unwanted pregnancies, take drugs or get raped or generally waste their lives. The reports I get must be nothing but big bad commie propaganda.

    Phew! Now you can tell me where this perfect American world is? I shall take the next bus there and check it out and report back to the Kremlin.

    I am personally very saddened to hear you tell me that I am not God. It would save me a lot of time to be able to walk across the Volga when not frozen. Bother!

    best give up IMO and try not to burst a blood vessel. Someone such as yourself who is so busy pontificating can hardly have to time to maintain physical fitness.

    Alyona.

  • Would Pro Choice Arguments Be The Same If...   1 day 18 hours ago
    Quote MarinaL:

    'A responsible, thoughtful, mature person of independent mind would understand that – and choose not to have children.'

    Cannot follow you one iota on this one Alberto.

    No, you can't. Someday you might, should you become that person.

  • End. Fracking. Now!   1 day 18 hours ago

    We should expand public transportation and concentrate housing near the hubs of metro rail stations, Like they did before cars.

  • We Need An Ebola Travel Ban Now   1 day 18 hours ago
    Quote douglaslee:

    Why a travel ban won't work

    However, just because it won't work means it won't be done, it's political gold due to ignorant radio hosts and cable tv agitators.

    I find nothing compelling in those arguments. Here's the main argument

    throttling travel would hammer already devastated West African countries, make it difficult to send relief where it’s needed, and send an unknown number of infected travelers into the shadows, increasing the difficulty of knowing how many were entering the U.S.

    All I see are empty assertions... and ridiculous ones at that. So if we prevent commercial travel FROM affected nations, this somehow will make it difficult to send supplies and personal TO affected nations? Totally absent from the "against" arguments is the simple question whether allowing travel to the US a de facto invitation to someone exposed to try and get here before they are symptomatic? All they have to do is look at the health care system in their nation compared to what Duncan got. Air travel is the fastest way to get to the US. If someone who's been exposed has to take a longer route to get here, isn't there more of a chance they'll be symptomatic and stopped somewhere else? Obviously a ban would work better if other nations were involved. Government's can provide flights in for supplies and relief workers to make up for the lack of commercial options. This isn't rocket science.

    It's these kinds of weak arguments that makes me wonder whether many of the talking points on the "left" are merely knee-jerk reactions against the right trying to exploit Ebola for political purposes.

  • Would Pro Choice Arguments Be The Same If...   1 day 18 hours ago

    'A responsible, thoughtful, mature person of independent mind would understand that – and choose not to have children.'

    Cannot follow you one iota on this one Alberto.

    1. I wait to have a child, hopefully two but constantly yearn for that time. That is because I am a healthy normal female.

    2.. Cannot understand why on earth I should not have children. My country is UNDER populated and wants a higher birthrate. More Russians are needed. When I am ready for children, I shall have more than enough resources and a well trained husband.

    So what on earth are you wittering on about?

  • Tricke down economics examined.   1 day 19 hours ago

    The only thing 99% of us have gotten out of trickle down economics is a wet pants leg.

    And now they're peeing on our heads and telling us it's raining.

    They'll need those gated and guarded little islands when the populus wises up about who depends on who.

  • Would Pro Choice Arguments Be The Same If...   1 day 19 hours ago
    Quote MarinaL: do think though that when the time is right, children can bring happiness

    Alyona

    Or a cute little puppy or a real live cuddly doll.

    It is not the parent’s happiness that needs to be considered but the child’s – the child’s. A responsible, thoughtful, mature person of independent mind would understand that – and choose not to have children.

    “Since I’ve assumed this form of life

    I’ve never known a moment’s rest

    Or peace. I wish my eyes

    Had never opened from my dream

    In happy nonexistence.”

    Mohammad Taqi Mir

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End. Fracking. Now!

California is already dealing with the worst drought in that state's history. So, the last thing residents needed was to learn that some of their dwindling water supply has been contaminated.