Recent comments

  • Why the states left the union   2 min ago

    http://www.livescience.com/18863-civil-war-myths.html

    The majority of KY enlistees fought for the north was a fact I had read and was searching for in the link.

    The Union went to war to end slavery.Credit: Deb G | Shutterstock

    Sometimes, Loewen said, the North is mythologized as going to war to free the slaves. That's more bad history, Loewen said: "The North went to war to hold the union together."

    Pres. Abraham Lincoln was personally against slavery, but in his first inaugural, he made it clear that placating the Southern states was more important. Quoting himself in other speeches, he said, "I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so." [Read: The Best Inaugural Addresses Ever]

    Abolitionism grew in the Union army as soldiers saw slaves flocking to them for freedom, contradicting myths that slavery was the appropriate position for African-Americans, Loewen said. But it wasn't until the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 — which left slavery intact in border states that hadn't seceded — that ending Confederate slavery became an official Union aim.

    Keeping the union together was a mistake, one Abe took for legacy. After he was no longer a white supremacist but before Ft Sumter, he had opined that all the great wars were over and since legacies are built on war, he would not have a legacy. Hell, he coud've sold TX back to Mexico under a proviso that they do not trade with the Confederacy. A few other boils would have been ditched and thus never needing lanced perennially as today.

    btw, Ron Paul agreed with me onetime. I thought I was alone until I heard his position. I think the US should be smaller anyhow so the south is one region ripe for their own sovereignity. CA, OR, & WA would be another.

  • Would Washington have asked for "Fast Track?"   45 min 13 sec ago

    Aliceinwonderland: If ever a man deserved to be the leader of the free world, it would be Senator Sanders. I can't disagree with your sentiment regarding "Barack the Betrayer", I think that's how Loren refers to him! My thoughts about him may be quite unfair because it's all just a gut feeling, but here is what I think. Obama knows that in two years his world/life, will be tied to, and associated with an elite class of wealthy citizens, many of of whom are rendered dilusive by the sheer magnitude of their wealth. It seems a common thread based on interviews I've heard, that this elite group believes they know what's best for all of the rest of us, and somehow we don't. Almost always what they profess to be best for us is in reality what's best for them....for example the Kochs wanting to dismantle the New Deal...that's simply a justification for more tax breaks for themselves and the desperate workforce that goes along with a weak central government. Without getting too wordy, I'll end with this...Obama wants to be a member of that club. He may not harbor the ugly greed associated with this class, but he wants to be accepted by them.....a validation of climbing the economic ladder. Those behind the TPP are the same folks he will be dining and golfing with in a few years....just my opinion!

  • Tax Cuts for the Rich Derailed the Train in Philadelphia   49 min 7 sec ago
    Quote ulTRAX:

    Quote mavibobo:How refreshing you are going to get back on topic instead of trying to prove you are smarter than me and failing. So let's get back on topic, if amtrak is funded through ticket sales and the fuel tax, how exactly do lower individual income tax rates affect amtrak? No irresponsible tax cuts is not an answer, no blaming it on wars will not do, I know this will take all of your answers away but try to come up with some thing.

    As I already answered in the other thread.... there you go again... assuming that if there are "billions" in ticket sales, that should be enough. You clearly didn't read the Brooking s report that showed the biggest losses to Amtrak are the longer routes. But then CONGRESS mandated they be kept. So if Amtrak just ran it profitable lines it might actually run in the black just as Conrail did.

    As for the Amtrak - income tax -war connection AGAIN I didn't make that argument... did I, Einstein? Ask Logan.

    I know you did not make the argument that tax cuts caused the train to crash but because that is the topic of the thread and you wanted to get back on topic I asked you to prove tax cuts caused the crash and because your standard answer is to claim bush had irresponsible tax cuts and lied us into a war. I decided to take those answers away from you.

    So are you going to answer or prove you are stupid by calling me Einstein again?

  • Do We Need Amtrak?   56 min 2 sec ago
    Quote ulTRAX:

    Quote mavibobo:I never said it should not dump the non profitable routes, or at least find a way to make it profitable. Maybe add some freight or mail to raise revenues.
    How do you know what's been tried or not tried?

    Here's the list of routes and how much they're losing. 2 routes lose over 60 million a year, 3 over 50 million, 2 lose over 40 million... and all the big losses are on routes over 700 miles long.

    http://www.brookings.edu/research/interactives/2013/amtrakroutes

    I'd rather see the money put into improving the profitable routes than subsidizing the unprofitable ones.

    I said that a long time ago and you ignored it to talk about some petty and stupid.

    I said they should improve the routes that make money first. Faster more comfortable trains then work on the other routes to make them better. Better facilities you can charge more per ticket. I do not know what has been tried and what has not been tried but I know they lose 80 million a year on hamburger. But then again they are government run so they probably buy them for 12 dollars and sell them for 6.

  • End the Banksters’ Get Out of Jail Free Card   1 hour 8 min ago

    Public school teachers go to jail for years after the RICO act is hurled at them.

    Make 500 billion on fraud, pay 3 or 4 from the profit, nobody is named, shamed, or goes to jail and the companies maintain employee misconduct insurance; that is not punishment and slaps on the wrist are corruption.

    One of the banks should have been shut down entirely and one exec should have gone to jail along with all the young cartel guns.

  • ONLY REAL MEN PLAY NFL FOOTBALL   1 hour 19 min ago

    The NFL is a monopoly. Too bad the CFL can't openly compete with the wife beating, gun toting, steriod pumping, ho' banging, public money sucking NFL and market itself as the progressive football league that allows gays and women. Then, if competition existed, you might see in some ways the CFL become more popular with certain demographics, but we don't enforce anti-trust laws since Robot Ronnie Reaganoid the Doomsayer.

    Something would still have to be done a'boot those 110 yards, kind of goofy.

  • Do We Need Amtrak?   2 hours 45 min ago
    Quote mavibobo:I never said it should not dump the non profitable routes, or at least find a way to make it profitable. Maybe add some freight or mail to raise revenues.
    How do you know what's been tried or not tried?

    Here's the list of routes and how much they're losing. 2 routes lose over 60 million a year, 3 over 50 million, 2 lose over 40 million... and all the big losses are on routes over 700 miles long.

    http://www.brookings.edu/research/interactives/2013/amtrakroutes

    I'd rather see the money put into improving the profitable routes than subsidizing the unprofitable ones.

  • US Early History: Manhattan’s Struggle for Human Freedom Against the Slave Power of Virginia   2 hours 46 min ago
    Part VI: Into the Future

    Image: Abraham Lincoln, Sixteenth President of the United States.
    “The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature."

    Abraham Lincoln
    First Inaugural Address

    A few weeks before his death, Gouverneur Morris wrote, in an open letter to leaders of the Federalist Party:

    Gentlemen, let us forget party and think of our country. That country embraces both parties. We must endeavor, therefore, to save and benefit both.... Such worthy men may, I trust, be found in both parties; and if our country be delivered, what does it signify whether those who operate her salvation wear a federal or democratic cloak?... Perhaps the expression of these sentiments may be imprudent; but when it appears proper to speak the truth, I know not concealment. It has been the unvarying principle of my life, that the interest of our country must be preferred to every other interest.

    Within days Morris would be dead. Through what leadership, and by what means could the words of his final political advice be accomplished? By 1816, all of the key New York leaders of Washington's first administration were gone. Although John Jay lived until 1829, he was in very poor health during the last twenty years of his life, and, except for two occasions—his opposition to the War of 1812 and his opposition to the Missouri Compromise— he remained in retirement from politics during that entire period. Rufus King lived until 1827, John Marshall until 1835 and Steven Van Rensselaer until 1839, but, despite the sometimes vital contributions of these individuals, the truth is that the promise of the Washington Administration died with Hamilton in 1804, and after the passing of Hamilton's partner Morris, the forces of the Slave Power controlled the nation. The obvious question was "What is to be done?"

    Once again, the leadership in continuing the battle would emanate from New York, but before we turn to that story, there is one issue which must be disposed of.

    Whence the Whigs?

    In our discussion of the American Patriotic Tradition there has been no mention, until now, of the Whig Party. This has been deliberate.

    The Whig Party, as a political party, was a deeply flawed institution, doomed to extinction from its moment of birth, and when the crises it had refused to address finally reached the point, in the 1850s, that the Nation itself faced dismemberment and ruin, that Party—lawfully—vanished, to be replaced by a new leadership, one founded on superior moral and philosophical principles. That new leadership was not the Republican Party, but the Lincoln Presidency.

    There were several serious shortcomings in the Whig Party, but its horrendous, fatal flaw was its subservience to the Slave Power throughout its brief twenty years of existence. Let's be blunt about it. Henry Clay was a slave-owner, and he pushed to extend slavery into the territories until his dying breath. Despite his positive accomplishments, William Henry Harrison was also a slave-owner who fought to bring Illinois into the Union as a slave state. We all know what happened to John Calhoun.

    This is not to say that there were not good—or even very good—people in the Whig Party, and the Whig Party was certainly a bastion of relative sanity when compared with the 1829-1841 Jackson and Van Buren Presidencies, but that was simply not adequate.

    One insight into this problem can be found in the "ownership" which the Virginia Combine exercised over the Philadelphia Democratic-Republican Societies. Mathew Carey's Olive Branch is subtitled "Faults on Both Sides," and it purports to present an even-handed criticism of the Federalist and Jeffersonian parties. But there is one, huge, glaring omission. Nowhere in that document does Carey once mention slavery, and this at a time when Gouverneur Morris and DeWitt Clinton were battling, by means of the Erie Canal Project, to break the grip of Virginia and the Slavocracy over the nation. In every Presidential election from 1800 to 1820, a Virginian had been elected President and a New Yorker Vice-President.(38) The strategic battle led by Morris and Clinton was to shatter the Virginia supremacy and to make New York City the navigator for the Nation's Destiny. This battle was raging at the time the Olive Branch was published, but it simply does not appear in that document.

    What of John Quincy Adams?, one might ask. First off, Adams was no Whig. He was his own Party; or, perhaps, one might say, in the words of Charles de Gaulle, that he used political parties "like taxi-cabs, to get to where he wanted to go." Adams went from being a Federalist, to a Democrat-Republican, to a National Republican, to a candidate of the Anti-Masonic Party,(39) to a Whig, and during his post-1830 tenure in Congress, when he often stood alone against the Slave Power, he was out-of-step and shunned by the majority of the Whig leadership.

    But there is more. The Whig Party is often seen as synonymous with Henry Clay's American System of Economics, as that "American System" is delineated in the three-point policy of: 1) a National Bank, 2) Internal Improvements, and 3) a high Protective Tariff.

    That "American System," as enumerated above, is absolutely not the same thing as Alexander Hamilton's policy, nor is it coherent with the "Hamiltonian Principle," as Lyndon LaRouche has defined it.

    First off—point by point—Hamilton actually vigorously opposed high protective tariffs. He considered them counterproductive to industrial and technological advancement, and injurious to trade. He supported a moderate tariff for revenue and to provide a modicum of protection to key parts of the economy. Secondly, on the National Bank, it must be understood that once Hamilton had left the Washington Administration, except for the brief 1825-1829 partnership between John Quincy Adams and Nicholas Biddle, neither the first nor the second National Bank ever functioned as a national Credit System in the way that Hamilton had intended. The issue was not the Bank, per se. A National Bank, yes; but for what purpose: to function as a mere monetary institution,— or as an engine for economic development?(40) The issue was one of intent. After Hamilton's death, the nation would not see a true Credit System until Lincoln's Greenback Policy of 1862.

    This brings us to the issue of Internal Improvements, and there are two critically important things to consider. During the period from 1830 to 1850, many canals, roads and other important projects were built in the United States. Certainly, the Whig Party was more supportive of these projects than most of the Democrats. Yet,—and this is very important,— except for the Quincy Adams Presidency, between 1797 and 1861 there was never any National development policy, including under Monroe and the various Whig Presidents. Essentially, the policy of Internal Improvements, as it was carried out during those years, has to be understood as a "States' Rights" internal improvement policy. Many good people did many good things, but it was the State Governments, or sometimes even private investors, who financed and built these projects, with practically no help or participation from the National Government. States were free to "do their own thing," but the hegemony of the Slave Power over the nation prevented any policy of unified National economic development. That Southern veto of a National policy was never seriously challenged by the Whigs.

    But there is a more profound, axiomatic, aspect to this. The policy of "internal improvements," i.e. "infrastructure" in the form of canals, roads, ports, etc.,—as important and beneficial as these endeavors might be,—is absolutely not the same thing as a Hamiltonian "Science Driver" policy. It is extremely important to recognize that, during the first Washington Administration, the Virginia Combine, led by Jefferson, Madison and Monroe, were far more opposed to the policy intent contained in Hamilton's Report on Manufactures, than they were to his National Bank Proposal. In that Report, far from proposing a passive system of protectionism, Hamilton posited an active central role for the National government, including both his system of "bounties," as well as the way in which a National Credit System would be utilized, in defining how the National Government would consciously and deliberately direct the industrial and scientific advancement of the Nation. National productivity, science, cognitive and skill levels would all be advanced in such a way that this would become the very nature of the Republic itself. This outlook is not the same thing as "internal improvements," and for the Slave Power-influenced Whigs, such a Hamiltonian Principle was impossible to implement, because it stemmed from a vision of the nature of the human species, of the actual human identity, incompatible with the outlook of the Slavocracy.

    The 1824 Election

    Geographically, the 1824 election bears a striking resemblance to that of 1812. DeWitt Clinton had carried every state but Vermont north of the Delaware River. In 1824, John Quincy Adams carried every state but New Jersey north of the Delaware River. In both elections, Pennsylvania and the rest of the country voted for a slave-owner. The key to the election was New York State. Without its electoral votes Adams had no chance of winning the Presidency, and the Democratic Republican political machine of New York was under the thumb of Martin Van Buren, who openly backed Crawford of Virginia. There was also significant support for Jackson in the state. At the beginning of the campaign, Adams' electoral prospects in New York were very dim. Two things changed that.

    First, DeWitt Clinton mounted an insurgent campaign, through the People's Party, for the New York Governorship, challenging the Van Buren-backed Democratic-Republican machine. Clinton's campaign became a referendum on his leadership in the Erie Canal Project, and Rufus King's son Charles joined the People's Party(41) and actively campaigned for Clinton. On election day, the voters overwhelming rejected the Van Buren state leadership and returned Canal-builder Clinton to office. At the same time, Rufus King publicly endorsed Adams and swung what was left of the Federalist Party base, still a significant though minority force in New York, behind the Adams campaign.(42) New York gave its electoral votes for Adams.

    After the nationwide election failed to deliver a majority to any of the four candidates, the choice for a new President was given to the House of Representatives, where it would be the Congressmen—not the Presidential Electors—who would decide. Here again, the allies of Martin Van Buren dominated the New York Congressional delegation. The way in which Presidential selection by the House of Representative is specified by the United States Constitution, is that each state, regardless of the number of its congressmen, shall have one vote. The vote of each individual state is determined by a majority vote within the delegation of each state. At the onset of deliberations, the majority of the New York congressional delegation was in favor of Van Buren's choice Crawford. It was New York Congressman, and the Chairmen of the Erie Canal Commission,(43) Steven Van Rensselaer who battled for an endorsement of Adams. In the final tally, Van Rensselaer cast the tie-breaking vote within the delegation, that gave the vote of New York to Adams. It was that New York State vote which then broke the tie in the House of Representatives and delivered the Presidency to Adams. Without it he would have failed to secure a majority.

    The Ties That Bind

    • John Jay's son, Peter Augustus Jay, served as the President of the Erie Canal Commission. He also followed in the footsteps of his father as President of the New York Manumission Society, and his single most famous act was a speech he delivered at the New York State Constitutional Convention in 1821, arguing that the righ

    • Steven Van Rensselaer, after leaving Congress in 1829, continued to serve on the Erie Canal Commission until 1839. In 1824, he conceived the idea of establishing a school of higher education "for the purpose of instructing persons, who may choose to apply themselves, in the application of science to the common purposes of life," and he established, entirely with his own funds, the Rensselaer School in Troy, New York (now the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute), located directly on the route of the Erie Canal. By the 1830s, Rensselaer's school became the foremost engineering school in United States. Rensselaer's son, Philip, married the daughter of James Tallmadge, the New York Congressman and protégé of DeWitt Clinton who introduced the famous Tallmadge Amendment in 1819 which almost blocked the admission of Missouri as a Slave State.

    • Rufus King's son Edward, would marry the daughter of Ohio Governor Worthington, DeWitt Clinton's collaborator in the building of the Ohio-Erie Canal, and then would himself serve as the President of the Erie Canal Commission. Another of his sons, Charles, became president of Columbia College, and Charles' son, Rufus King, Jr., migrated to Wisconsin, was a signer of the Wisconsin State Constitution, a founder of the Wisconsin Republican Party, and an early backer of Abraham Lincoln's Presidential Campaign. In 1863 Lincoln named him Ambassador to the Vatican, and in 1866 King personally arrested the Lincoln assassin John Surratt, who was hiding as a Papal Zouave in Rome!

    • James Tallmadge—in addition to his leadership in fighting both the Missouri Compromise and the admission of Arkansas as a Slave Territory, Tallmadge was a fierce advocate of a national economic development policy, including national funding for the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, (finally built under the Quincy Adams administration). After leaving the Congress, Tallmadge would serve from 1831 to 1850 as the President of the American Institute of the City of New York, an organization devoted to the promotion of inventions and scientific education.

    • Peter Cooper—the creator of the Tom Thumb steam locomotive in 1830, the first man to successfully use anthracite coal to puddle iron, and the first person to extensively use the Bessemer blast furnace method, Cooper was a remarkable figure. In the 1830s, he began a years-long collaboration with DeWitt Clinton on the improvement of public education in New York City.44 This ultimately led to Cooper's decision to create "The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art," an institution, financed entirely by Cooper, and intended by him to be modeled on the École Polytechnique in Paris. Enrollment was free, open to all—men or women, black or white—and aimed primarily at the working class population of the City. In 1860 the Cooper Union hosted the prospective Presidential candidate Abraham Lincoln, and after the attack on Fort Sumter, in April of 1861, a massive public rally was held at Union Square, only nine blocks north of Cooper's school. The 70-year old Cooper was one of the first speakers at the rally, saying:

    "We are contending with an enemy not only determined on our destruction as a nation, but to build on our ruins a government devoted with all its power to maintain, extend, and perpetuate a system in itself revolting to all the best feelings of humanity,—an institution that enables thousands to sell their own children into hopeless bondage.

    "Shall it succeed? You say 'no!' and I unite with you in your decision. We cannot allow it to succeed. We should spend our lives, our property, and leave the land itself a desolation before such an institution should triumph over the free people of this country I unite with you in your ...."

    In 1864, when there was a strong chance that the Democrat McClellan might carry New York City, it was Cooper who organized a great mass meeting for September 27, 1864, in the Hall of Cooper Union to rally the population behind Lincoln.

    In 1876, this Peter Cooper, an enthusiastic supporter of Lincoln's Greenback policy, was nominated and ran as the Presidential candidate of the Greenback Party. Seven years later, when Cooper died at the age of 92, his funeral procession was the largest in the City since that of George Washington.

    The Pathfinder & the Candidate

    The life and works of James Fenimore Cooper are far too vast a subject for a short work such as this, but let us simply say this:

    James Fenimore Cooper's father, William Cooper, was a close political ally to Philip Schuyler, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay. John Jay's son, Peter Augustus, was James Fenimore's closest and most intimate friend throughout the lives of the two men.

    In his young adult years, Cooper formed an intense political loyalty to DeWitt Clinton, which continued until Clinton's death. Later, it would be President John Quincy Adams who would secure Cooper a European Consulship. Essentially, one might say that the Erie Canal Principle is to be found in Cooper's personal and political life.

    Over a thirty-year period, beginning with the 1821 publication of The Spy: A Tale of the Neutral Ground and ending with the 1851 writing of New York: or The Towns of Manhattan, Cooper, perhaps more than any other individual, was personally responsible for sustaining and developing the Idea of Hamilton's New York. From his attacks on the oligarchy, beginning with The Bravo, to his vision of an American Republic of Free (non-slave) Citizens in the Leatherstocking Tales and elsewhere, to his chronicling of the civilizing of New York State in the wake of the Erie Canal, it was Cooper who bridged the span from Washington's (Manhattan) inauguration of 1789, to Lincoln's (Manhattan) Cooper Union Speech of 1860.

    Cooper's final work, New York: or The Towns of Manhattan, remained unfinished and unpublished at the time of his death in 1851, but the completed introduction to that work began to circulate under a variety of titles, including "On Secession and States Rights," shortly after Cooper's death. This work—written ten years before the inauguration of Lincoln—addresses directly the issue of the expansion of slavery into the territories, and the mortal danger that the expansion of the Slave Power poses to the nation. The wording and subject matter of Cooper's final work, echo the battles against the Slave Power going back to the Northwest Ordinance, the Constitutional Convention, and the continuous fight led by Washington's New Yorkers.

    Nine years later, Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous Cooper Union Speech at the Great Hall, located at the intersection of Fifth Street and Third Avenue in Manhattan. For those not familiar with the speech, two things should be conveyed. First, this was the singular speech which made possible Lincoln's achievement of the Republican Party Presidential nomination. Prior to the speech, it was considered almost certain that the nomination would go to New York State's own William Seward. Lincoln came into Seward's home territory and took the hearts and minds of Seward's supporters out from under him.

    Second, the subject matter of Lincoln's speech on that occasion, was the mortal danger posed to the Republic by the continuing, rapacious drive by the Slavocracy to expand its power, particularly through the spread of slavery into the territories. In the text of the speech, Lincoln names—name by name—Hamilton, Morris, Jay, and King, as leaders of the Nation who had fought the Slave Power from the beginning.

    Gouverneur Morris once stated that New Yorkers were "born cosmopolite." In a very real way, that short assertion defines the nature of the City. The localism, the backwardness, the rural idiocy of the Southern Slave System, could find no home in New York. Even after the infestation of the financial parasites—Aaron Burr, Martin Van Buren, August Belmont and J.P. Morgan—Manhattan has always been Hamilton's New York, and the financial agents of Empire merely a foreign bacillus that has no legitimate existence. It is still to this day the cultural, educational, financial, and—in a very real sense—the political capital of the United States.

    In the mid-1960s, only about two decades after the death of New Yorker Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Lyndon LaRouche initiated a series of classes and lectures at Columbia University —the alma mater of Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and Gouverneur Morris—which attracted young people, and led eventually into the founding of the LaRouche political movement, an association which stands to this day. It is that movement, our movement, which speaks for Hamilton's New York.

    Epilogue

    On July Ninth, 1804 Gouverneur Morris made the following entry in his diary:

    General Hamilton was killed in a duel this morning by Colonel Burr. I go to town, but meet (opposite to the hospital) Martin Wilkins, who tells me General Hamilton is yet alive at Greenwich Street, and not, as I was told this morning, already dead. Go there. When I arrive he is speechless. The scene is too powerful for me, so that I am obliged to walk in the garden to take breath. After having composed myself, I return and sit by his side till he expires. He is opened, and we find that the ball has broken one of his ribs, passed through the lower part of the liver, and lodged in the vertebrae of his back: a most melancholy scene. His wife almost frantic with grief, his children in tears, every person present deeply afflicted, the whole city agitated, every countenance dejected. This evening I am asked to pronounce a funeral oration. I promise to do so if I can possibly command myself enough, but express my belief that it will be utterly impossible. I am wholly unmanned by this day's spectacle.

    Two days later, at the request of Elizabeth Hamilton, Morris delivered the Funeral Oration for Alexander Hamilton in Manhattan. These are excerpts:

    Fellow-Citizens,

    If on this sad, this solemn occasion, I should endeavor to move your commiseration, it would be doing injustice to that sensibility which has been so generally and so justly manifested. Far from attempting to excite your emotions, I must try to repress my own, and yet I fear that instead of the language of a public speaker, you will hear only the lamentations of a bewailing friend. But I will struggle with my bursting heart, to portray that Heroic Spirit, which has flown to the mansions of bliss.

    Students of Columbia! He was in the ardent pursuit of knowledge in your academic shades, when the first sound of the American war called him to the field. A young and unprotected volunteer, such was his zeal and so brilliant his service that we heard his name before we knew his person. It seemed as if God had called him suddenly into existence, that he might assist to save a world!

    The penetrating eye of Washington soon perceived the manly spirit which animated his youthful bosom. By that excellent judge of men he was selected as an Aide, and thus he became early acquainted with, and was a principal actor in, the most important scenes of our Revolution.

    At the siege of York, he pertinaciously insisted and he obtained the command of a Forlorn Hope. He stormed the redoubt; but let it be recorded, that not one single man of the enemy perished. His gallant troops emulating the example of their chief checked the uplifted arm, and spared a foe no longer resisting. Here closed his military career.

    Shortly after the war, your favor, no, your discernment called him to public office. You sent him to the convention at Philadelphia: he there assisted in forming that constitution which is now the bond of our union, the shield of our defence and the source of our prosperity. In signing that compact he exprest his apprehension that it did not contain sufficient means of strength for its own preservation; and that in consequence we should share the fate of many other republics and pass through Anarchy to Despotism. We hoped better things. We confided in the good sense of the American people, and above all we trusted in the protecting Providence of the Almighty. On this important subject he never concealed his opinion. He disdained concealment. Knowing the purity of his heart, he bore it as it were in his hand, exposing to every passenger its inmost recesses. This generous indiscretion subjected him to censure from misrepresentation. His speculative opinions were treated as deliberate designs; and yet you all know how strenuous, how unremitting were his efforts to establish and to preserve the constitution. If then his opinion was wrong, pardon, oh! pardon that single error, in a life devoted to your service.

    At the time when our government was organized, we were without funds, though not without resources. To call them into action, and establish order in the finances, Washington sought for splendid talents, for extensive information, and above all, he sought for sterling, incorruptible integrity. All these he found in Hamilton... And the result was a rapid advance in power and prosperity, of which there is no example in any other age or nation. The part which Hamilton bore is universally known.

    His unsuspecting confidence in professions which he believed to be sincere, led him to trust too much to the undeserving. This exposed him to misrepresentation. He felt himself obliged to resign. The care of a rising family, and the narrowness of his fortune, made it a duty to return to his profession for their support. But though he was compelled to abandon public life, never, no, never for a moment did he abandon the public service. He never lost sight of your interests. I declare to you, before that God in whose presence we are now so especially assembled, that in his most private and confidential conversations, the single objects of discussion and consideration were your freedom and happiness...

    Brethren of the Cincinnati! There lies our chief! Let him still be our model. Like him, after a long and faithful public service, let us cheerfully perform the social duties of private life. Oh! he was mild and gentle. In him there was no offence; no guile. His generous hand and heart were open to all....

    Fellow Citizens! You have long witnessed his professional conduct, and felt his unrivaled eloquence. You know how well he performed the duties of a citizen. You know that he never courted your favor by adulation, or the sacrifice of his own judgment. You have seen him contending against you, and saving your dearest interests, as it were, in spite of yourselves. And you now feel and enjoy the benefits resulting from the firm energy of his conduct. Bear this testimony to the memory of my departed friend. I charge you to protect his fame. It is all he has left, all that these poor orphan children will inherit from their father. But, my countrymen, that fame may be a rich treasure to you also. Let it be the test by which to examine those who solicit your favour. Disregarding professions, view their conduct and on a doubtful occasion, ask, Would Hamilton have done this thing?

  • Do We Need Amtrak?   2 hours 59 min ago
    Quote mavibobo:
    Quote ulTRAX:
    Quote mavibobo:
    Quote ulTRAX:
    Quote mavibobo:I must think I am einstien.
    I'm sure you do.

    You must think I am too, you keep calling me einstien

    I've never called you einstien. Because it's EINSTEIN... not einstien.

    And let me guess... since you never admit to any stupid things you claim are true or mistakes you make, you're going to now say that of course you know how to spell his name...

    Wow you are a stupid petty little man, you have to point out that you capitalize and I did not. Now do you have anything concerning the thread.
    Thanks for AGAIN proving that you can't take responsibility for your mistakes. Try reading what I wrote again. Now have anything to say on the topic?

  • An open discussion of Schizophrenia being a phenomena, not a cause and effect...   3 hours 16 min ago

    To everyone here,

    Whenever I feel bad or have had felt bad in the past, I like to forgive my brain for its troubles. I imagine taking my brain out of my head, and while holding it in my hands, I say to it that I forgive it. I tell it that I know this situation is not its fault. I tell it that I know it can't leave its present situation even though it wants to. I tell it that regardless of whatever mechanism is causing my problems, they are not the fault of it, of me, or anybody else. Then I gently take my brain and put it back in my head. Then I feel better because I don't feel like blaming others or myself for this "stuff."

  • President Putin has a Chance to Crush the Corrupt American Global Financial System and the Wall Street Mafia.   3 hours 18 min ago

    The Russian people because:

    1) he played the nationalism card

    2) there is no history of democracy nor democratic institutions but the is much history of strongman rulers

    Of course that isn't good but it is the situation imo.

  • Why Do Neoconfederates Rewrite History To Justify Secession?   3 hours 19 min ago
    Quote Steven.PBarrett:

    C'mon guys ... "Decoration Day" is upon us. Enjoy it and give this thread its last rites. In the boneyard near my house there's the remains of a member of the famed Glory MA 54th Regmt. At least he's at rest knowing the issue's been solved long ago and he he had something constructive to say about it.

    Obviously the South's War For Slavery is a settled issue... but not why some today are trying to rewrite the history books.

  • Tax Cuts for the Rich Derailed the Train in Philadelphia   3 hours 46 min ago
    Quote ulTRAX:
    Quote mavibobo:How refreshing you are going to get back on topic instead of trying to prove you are smarter than me and failing. So let's get back on topic, if amtrak is funded through ticket sales and the fuel tax, how exactly do lower individual income tax rates affect amtrak? No irresponsible tax cuts is not an answer, no blaming it on wars will not do, I know this will take all of your answers away but try to come up with some thing.

    As I already answered in the other thread.... there you go again... assuming that if there are "billions" in ticket sales, that should be enough. You clearly didn't read the Brooking s report that showed the biggest losses to Amtrak are the longer routes. But then CONGRESS mandated they be kept. So if Amtrak just ran it profitable lines it might actually run in the black just as Conrail did.

    As for the Amtrak - income tax -war connection AGAIN I didn't make that argument... did I, Einstein? Ask Logan.

    Ultrax is correct. He did not make that argument.

  • President Putin has a Chance to Crush the Corrupt American Global Financial System and the Wall Street Mafia.   3 hours 50 min ago

    So tell me ... who's for Putin and what he stands for? Really now. Who's for Putin?

  • Why Do Neoconfederates Rewrite History To Justify Secession?   3 hours 51 min ago

    C'mon guys ... "Decoration Day" is upon us. Enjoy it and give this thread its last rites. In the boneyard near my house there's the remains of a member of the famed Glory MA 54th Regmt. At least he's at rest knowing the issue's been solved long ago and he he had something constructive to say about it.

  • Free Books   3 hours 55 min ago

    Grimms wrote over 200 tales, some short enough to read as one might take a bite of a just baked pie, for a taste:

    THE STRAW, THE COAL, AND THE BEAN

    In a village dwelt a poor old woman, who had gathered together a dish of beans and wanted to cook them. So she made a fire on her hearth, and that it might burn the quicker, she lighted it with a handful of straw. When she was emptying the beans into the pan, one dropped without her observing it, and lay on the ground beside a straw, and soon afterwards a burning coal from the fire leapt down to the two. Then the straw began and said: 'Dear friends, from whence do you come here?' The coal replied: 'I fortunately sprang out of the fire, and if I had not escaped by sheer force, my death would have been certain,—I should have been burnt to ashes.' The bean said: 'I too have escaped with a whole skin, but if the old woman had got me into the pan, I should have been made into broth without any mercy, like my comrades.' 'And would a better fate have fallen to my lot?' said the straw. 'The old woman has destroyed all my brethren in fire and smoke; she seized sixty of them at once, and took their lives. I luckily slipped through her fingers.'

    'But what are we to do now?' said the coal.

    'I think,' answered the bean, 'that as we have so fortunately escaped death, we should keep together like good companions, and lest a new mischance should overtake us here, we should go away together, and repair to a foreign country.'

    The proposition pleased the two others, and they set out on their way together. Soon, however, they came to a little brook, and as there was no bridge or foot-plank, they did not know how they were to get over it. The straw hit on a good idea, and said: 'I will lay myself straight across, and then you can walk over on me as on a bridge.' The straw therefore stretched itself from one bank to the other, and the coal, who was of an impetuous disposition, tripped quite boldly on to the newly-built bridge. But when she had reached the middle, and heard the water rushing beneath her, she was after all, afraid, and stood still, and ventured no farther. The straw, however, began to burn, broke in two pieces, and fell into the stream. The coal slipped after her, hissed when she got into the water, and breathed her last. The bean, who had prudently stayed behind on the shore, could not but laugh at the event, was unable to stop, and laughed so heartily that she burst. It would have been all over with her, likewise, if, by good fortune, a tailor who was travelling in search of work, had not sat down to rest by the brook. As he had a compassionate heart he pulled out his needle and thread, and sewed her together. The bean thanked him most prettily, but as the tailor used black thread, all beans since then have a black seam.

  • US Early History: Manhattan’s Struggle for Human Freedom Against the Slave Power of Virginia   3 hours 55 min ago

    Oh, not this argument again. The last time any potential long strung out debate like this gets started and rolling, it usually takes a hell of a long argument, possibly followed by a war or long strung out quotes and counter-quotes to "get us to the bottom of the argument" and before we know it, we're deep in it looking up a few miles. Let's give this a rest.

  • US Early History: Manhattan’s Struggle for Human Freedom Against the Slave Power of Virginia   3 hours 56 min ago

    Oh, not this argument again. The last time any potential long strung out debate like this gets started and rolling, it usually takes a hell of a long argument, possibly followed by a war or long strung out quotes and counter-quotes to "get us to the bottom of the argument" and before we know it, we're deep in it looking up a few miles. Let's give this a rest.

  • Do We Need Amtrak?   3 hours 56 min ago
    Quote ulTRAX:

    Quote mavibobo:
    Quote ulTRAX:
    Quote mavibobo:I must think I am einstien.
    I'm sure you do.

    You must think I am too, you keep calling me einstien

    I've never called you einstien. Because it's EINSTEIN... not einstien.

    And let me guess... since you never admit to any stupid things you claim are true or mistakes you make, you're going to now say that of course you know how to spell his name...

    Wow you are a stupid petty little man, you have to point out that you capitalize and I did not. Now do you have anything concerning the thread.

  • A FRAUD, A LIAR and A WIFE BEATER accused Bill O'Reilly has all bases covered   3 hours 59 min ago

    NEven just publishing a whiff of a suspicion of wife beating used to derail the biggest blowhards in politics, press and entertainment. With O'Reilly you get all three "professions" of course. Being a statesman or public servant used to be thought of primarily as a calling. Same somewhat for being a responsible reporter/journalist because to be thought of as responsible, one has to earn the reputation and that takes the discipline of somebody who believes he or she is called to report just the facts and in a just fair and really truthfully unbiased/balanced way. And being an entertainer requires the drive of somebody called to entertain in such a way as to leave his or her audience feeling better about themselves, and the world they live in, or if not feeling better, because we need exposure to tragedy in drama and artwork, at least better informed.

    No such calling or cover can be found for alleged wife beaters. If football players have to bench it out for a while, O'Reilly's no different. But hell, to paraphrase an old cheapshot thrown in the direction of alleged or convicted/self-admitted wife-beaters, we only need to posit this question to the O-Man to discredit him: "When was the las time you stopped assaulting the truth, Bill?"

  • TPP: Democrats' Fast track bill being rushed through despite millions of Jobs being at stake.   4 hours 12 min ago

    Not that I think it will do any good, but I have sent the following message to both my senators:

    Senators Murray and Cantwell:

    I am writing to express my anger and dismay at your aye votes on the TPA. That any public policy legislation can be withheld from public scrutiny is anathema to the ethos this country should uphold. That any member of the legislature can be compelled to review prospective legislation in secret and disallowed from even keeping their own notes is an outrage. That you would approve such treatment amounts to an abrogation of your constitutional responsibilities.

    As to the subject of the legislation, the founding fathers wisely constrained the executive from making treaties without supermajority support and I am amazed that congress would consider ceding such authority. I can think of no explanation except to provide political cover when the TPP comes up for a vote.

    I am hoping the house refuses to pass this abortion of a bill. Should the TPA pass, and the TPP is passed as well, I will both vote for your future opponents and support them financially as well.

    Shame on you.

  • Daily Topics - Thursday May 21st, 2015   4 hours 12 min ago

    I still like "mark".

  • Clean Water.....no water, no life   4 hours 20 min ago
    Quote LysanderSpooner:

    Private ownership of water with strict protection of the ensuing property rights is a much better way to keep water clean.

    With strict protection of property rights defined by a set of governing institutions that the corporations own and control with capital... It's a tautology.

  • Do We Need Amtrak?   4 hours 47 min ago
    Quote mavibobo:
    Quote ulTRAX:
    Quote mavibobo:I must think I am einstien.
    I'm sure you do.

    You must think I am too, you keep calling me einstien

    I've never called you einstien. Because it's EINSTEIN... not einstien.

    And let me guess... since you never admit to any stupid things you claim are true or mistakes you make, you're going to now say that of course you know how to spell his name...

  • Do We Need Amtrak?   4 hours 48 min ago
    Quote ulTRAX:

    Quote mavibobo:
    Quote ulTRAX:
    Quote mavibobo:As far as amtrak same question if the 2 plus billion dollars is not enough to keep the company running should the tax payers give them more to pissed away on 15 dollar hamburgers they sell for 5 dollars or should we make them support themselves like everyone else.
    There you go again... assuming that if there are "billions" in ticket sales, that should be enough. You clearly didn't read the Brooking s report that showed the biggest losses to Amtrak are the longer routes. But then CONGRESS mandated they be kept. So if Amtrak just ran it profitable lines it might actually run in the black.

    It should be enough in business if inbound revenues are not enough to cover your nut you either raise your rates find new revenues or go out of business.
    There's still a market to contend with. If Amtrak raises its prices too much, other forms of transportation look more attractive. If Amtrak were run more like a business it would dump the unprofitable routes instead of subsidize them. While there may be management problems, Congress made it worst by insisting long haul routes be maintained. Why are you determined to ignore this?

    I never said it should not dump the non profitable routes, or at least find a way to make it profitable. Maybe add some freight or mail to raise revenues.

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Can we make California the last oil spill?

A state of emergency has been declared in California after crews realized that the Rufugio Beach oil spill was five times worse than original estimates. This week, the Plains All American Pipeline ruptured and dumped crude oil over a four-mile stretch of pristine California coastline.