The Media Doesn't Want Democrats to Have Big Bold Ideas but Republicans Can....

Thom plus logo The Republicans have some big bold ideas. At least 17 million voters were purged nationwide between 2016 and 2018, according to a study by the Brennan Center for Justice, because Republicans have the big idea that only white people should vote. Here's another. The Republican-controlled Senate confirmed 13 of Trump's lifetime judicial nominees just this week - Trump has now appointed one in five of all federal judges, more than any president in history - a major victory in Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's years-long effort to reshape the nation's courts and drag them further to the right for decades to come. It's one of the biggest ideas in history - for a single political party to take over the entire judiciary in a nearly purely political move. It'll help them with their "big ideas" of rolling back Roe and Brown v Board and making it legal again to discriminate against blacks and gays.

The Democrats just hit a Yuge landmark with a majority of Democrats signing on for Medicare for All, a Democratic Big Idea first introduced by President Harry Truman. But the Washington Post Editorial just ripped Warren and Sanders for promoting ideas that, "can't work."

While the corporate media praises or just assumes that Republican big ideas are a good thing, or at least normal stuff for that party, for some reason they don't think that Democrats should have any big ideas. Don't break up the big banks and other monopolies, don't offer free college, don't join the rest of the developed world by kicking the parasites out of a national healthcare system. And Republicans still like to call it the "liberal press." Hah!

-Thom

The inescapable truth about rightwing billionaires and Trump

Thom plus logo Hint: It's all about the money

Some very wealthy people helped put Donald Trump in office, and have continued to subsidize the Trump presidency and those Republicans who enable it.
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