The Danger Of Privatizing the Commons

Thom plus logo Wildfires destroying people's homes in California and people dying because they can't afford their insulin are the same thing. Both are examples of how corporations have risen up and taken over the legislative process, turning the power of government to their own ends of ever greater profits. This was all made possible by the Supreme Court in the late 1970s in a series of decisions that said that when billionaires and corporations buy and own politicians, that is "free speech" rather than bribery and therefore cannot be regulated. We must overturn these corrupt decisions by the Supreme Court if we are to return the American political system to the American people and thus restore democracy to America.

-Thom

Comments

Willie W's picture
Willie W 2 weeks 4 days ago
#1

Socialism equals free stuff. I get it! Back when I was in the service, not only did I get a pay check; the government gave me free housing, meals, and health care. My kids graduated from high school. All free! Even got free rides back and forth, the whole time. The county re-paved my road last year. No charge! Snow plows run up and down my road all winter. Free!!! Police and fire are on call 24/7 if I need them. No charge. We get free Social Security and free flu shots. Free anual physicals. Of course, none of this stuff is really free. It just seems that way because we don't have to write a bunch of checks, or worry about affording critical services. So, if anyone wants all this "free" stuff privatized----------- Good luck with that!!!

SueN's picture
SueN 2 weeks 3 days ago
#2

Funny how some people who tout freedom don't want us to be (relatively) free from moneygrabbers or fear. They just want to be free to eextract as much profit from us as they can.

Legend 2 weeks 2 days ago
#3

PG&E is a local monopoly run amuck. They want zero liability for poor maintenace and will shut off electricity until they get their way. Solution is to nationalize the national grid. It does not work having hundred of companies with local monopolies. Then the national grid could be modernized and purchase power from utilities at low bid. As it is you have to buy electricty at what ever it costs them to make it plus a markup (including huge CEO and upper management salaries). Thus we have a lot of old inefficient power plants and no competition. Isn't capitalism great?

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