Democratic Debates: Is It Time to Get the Corporate TV Stars off the Stage?

Thom plus logo The democratic debate, operating entirely within the context of corporate TV stars' questions and largely Republican frames, shows once again why a for-profit "news" operation shouldn't be running a presidential debate. In 1988, the Democratic and Republican parties set up a corporation to handle the debates, and the League of Women Voters for the first time in generations refused to participate, saying the political parties had turned it into a sham. And a sham is exactly what we saw last night, with no questions at all about the environment, corporate power, media concentration (which gave Trump $2 billion in free publicity last time around), or why Congress only passes legislation to benefit the top 1%.

It's time to bring back deep and meaningful conversations like the league used to have, and get the multimillionaire TV stars off the stage.

-Thom

Comments

Tinhip's picture
Tinhip 25 weeks 1 hour ago
#1

Thom, this is probably something we don't have to worry about since the ratings for each of these "debates" are tanking exponentially. It appears nature will take care of this problem all by herself.

A sad snippet from Variety on viewership,

"Last night’s Democratic debate, which saw frontrunner Elizabeth Warren come under attack from all sides, drew around 8.3 million total viewers on CNN.

That viewership figure is down 46% on the first NBC debate which was watched by 15.3 million viewers, and also on the two previous CNN debates which garnered 10.7 million (down 22%) and 9 million (down 8%) respectively. None of the Democratic debates so far in this cycle have come near to the 24 million viewership figure posted by Donald Trump’s first debate on Fox News in August of 2015."

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Thom plus logo In two or three weeks we're going to start seeing people show up in hospitals in Wisconsin because of the stunt Republicans in the Wisconsin legislature, the Wisconsin Supreme Court, and the US Supreme Court pulled off this week. Many of those people will die, just so Republicans could suppress the vote in Wisconsin.

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