The Supreme Court Broke Politics - How Do We Now Reform the Supreme Court?

Thom plus logo We complain about the state of American politics; about a mentally ill billionaire in the White House and a Republican Party crawling with hustlers and conmen, and a few in the Democratic Party as well. The complaints are legitimate, but most people don't realize why the situation is as bad as it is. That tracks back, virtually 100%, to several supreme court decisions starting in 1976 that deregulated money in politics, claiming that political spending was simply First Amendment-protected "free speech." The Supreme Court first ruled that in 1976, setting up the flood of money that poured into Washington DC and brought us Ronald Reagan in 1980. They doubled down with Citizens United in 2010, paving the way for foreign oligarchs to help elect Donald Trump and a completely corrupted Republican-controlled Senate.

-Thom

Comments

Calson's picture
Calson 32 weeks 6 days ago
#1

It really started when a Supreme Court opinion laid the groundwork for having a corporation granted the legal rights of a person (except when a crime is committed and they fall through the cracks). It is why a corporation, now considered a person, has protections with regard to free speech and so can spend unlimited amounts to put their own servants into office.

Willie W's picture
Willie W 32 weeks 6 days ago
#2

The Supreme Court should always consist of five Democrats (chosen by Democrats) and five Republicans (chosen by Republicans) reguardless of who happens to be in power when a Justice retires. Always five and five. "Fair and balanced."

SueN's picture
SueN 32 weeks 5 days ago
#3

You'd probably end up with nothing being decided, given how partisan they are these days.

Ming's picture
Ming 31 weeks 16 hours ago
#4

... and no other cases can be heard until a majority decision has been reached.

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