How Are We Going to Pay for the Pentagon?

Thom plus logo When the Founding generation wrote the constitution, they were very worried about a permanent defense industry emerging. They saw that as something that could corrupt a country, as they had watched nation after nation throughout history be overthrown by military coups and corrupted by partisans funded or supported by their countries' own military. Therefore, they wrote into Article 1 Section 8 of the Constitution, that the military may not be funded for any longer than two years. Period. Ever. As a result, every two years Congress has to reevaluate our military spending from top to bottom, and the military funding is referred to as "must pass" legislation because if it doesn't pass the military shuts down.

This year the US military is asking for $738 billion. Compare that with the Department of Defense's budget for the year 2000: $384 billion. By building weapons manufacturing facilities in every congressional district in America, the defense industry, what President Eisenhower referred to as the "Military Industrial Complex,"has become a giant parasite attached to the American taxpayer.

While Donald Trump is preparing to throw over 3 million people off food stamps because we "can't afford" the less than $1 billion it costs to feed people in America. When it comes to things that help people, Republicans always scream, "How are we going to pay for it?" But when it comes to the Pentagon's budget, this year they are poised to give it even more money than it's asking for. Dwight Eisenhower's warning has come true, and it's time for American politicians to do something about it.

-Thom

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