'Epic of Gilgamesh': How Mad King Trump angered the gods

Thom plus logo In the 4,000-year-old "Epic of Gilgamesh," the arrogant eponymous king killed Humbaba, the giant guardian of the forest so that he could cut down the cedar stands in what is now northern Iraq to build his great city of Uruk. Gilgamesh's people then diverted the Euphrates River to irrigate fields of barley.

To avenge Humbaba's murder and the destruction of the forest, the gods cursed Gilgamesh and his people. One Sumerian writer mourned that "the earth turned white. It was one of our first stories about environmental destruction-in this case, a salt buildup from irrigation that turned the fields to desert.

The histories of most ancient civilizations carry similar stories of when their god or gods turned against the people and millions died because of environmentally destructive practices.

If Gilgamesh's poet were to write the "Epic" today, it might go something like this:

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-Thom

Comments

Legend 17 weeks 5 days ago
#1

10 year Economy.

Legend 17 weeks 5 days ago
#2

On the 4/2/2020 show, Hour 1 Thom talked about Nurses and front line workers being fired for wearing masks etc. The Navy relieved the Captain of the aircraft Carrier that has had an out break of Covid-19. It takes a lot of knowledge and training to be the Captain of a nuclear aircraft carrier and that will probably be lost to retirement. Or let's hope that he is not court marshalled. As with most positions in the Trump administration, the Secretary of the Navy that fired the captain is in an acting position. Trump?

flyguy129's picture
flyguy129 17 weeks 4 days ago
#3

The Big Lie versus grieving families and a dying democracy

Thom plus logo It's showing up in the obituaries.

People in the throes of agony from losing someone close to them are writing things like, "Instead of flowers, donate to a Democrat," or "instead of flowers, tell everyone to vote against Trump and the GOP this fall." It's become a national trend.
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